Chock full of appealing ideas, with a thorough table of contents, index, and a colorful, illustrated layout, to boot....

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STICKY FINGERS

DIY DUCT TAPE PROJECTS—EASY TO PICK UP, HARD TO PUT DOWN

Clear directions for nifty-looking duct-tape crafts abound in this guide, featuring items that can be made for school and home, to wear and to carry tablets, phones and even lunch.

A brief introduction details the evolution of duct tape as it moved from its utilitarian but dull silver hue at the hardware store to its ubiquitous availability in a rainbow assortment of colors and patterns. Maletsky efficiently breaks down the basics of what readers will need to get started and pragmatically suggests how to organize supplies into a portable bin. First comes instruction in the core techniques that are needed, plus tape-saving methods for using tarpaulin material and felt as a backing and a handy evaluation of which brands and types of the sticky stuff offer users the most bang for their buck. Then 58 different projects are offered, each one coded for its level of ease and estimated completion time. Though many will appeal broadly, there are some that are geared most readily to young teens who favor the traditionally girly—such as a watermelon-slice–shaped clutch purse and an earring tree that uses a toilet-paper tube as its trunk. Also included are plenty of clever ideas for how to create embellishments like tassels, stickers, rosettes and ruffles. 

Chock full of appealing ideas, with a thorough table of contents, index, and a colorful, illustrated layout, to boot. (Nonfiction. 9-16)

Pub Date: July 1, 2014

ISBN: 978-1-936976-54-6

Page Count: 242

Publisher: Zest Books

Review Posted Online: May 28, 2014

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2014

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Sympathetic in tone, optimistic in outlook, not heavily earnest: nothing to be afraid of.

SCARED STIFF

50 PHOBIAS THAT FREAK US OUT

Part browsing item, part therapy for the afflicted, this catalog of irrational terrors offers a little help along with a lot of pop psychology and culture.

The book opens with a clinical psychologist’s foreword and closes with a chapter of personal and professional coping strategies. In between, Latta’s alphabetically arranged encyclopedia introduces a range of panic-inducers from buttons (“koumpounophobia”) and being out of cellphone contact (“nomophobia”) to more widespread fears of heights (“acrophobia”), clowns (“coulroiphobia”) and various animals. There’s also the generalized “social anxiety disorder”—which has no medical name but is “just its own bad self.” As most phobias have obscure origins (generally in childhood), similar physical symptoms and the same approaches to treatment, the descriptive passages tend toward monotony. To counter that, the author chucks in references aplenty to celebrity sufferers, annotated lists of relevant books and (mostly horror) movies, side notes on “joke phobias” and other topics. At each entry’s end, she contributes a box of “Scare Quotes” such as a passage from Coraline for the aforementioned fear of buttons.

Sympathetic in tone, optimistic in outlook, not heavily earnest: nothing to be afraid of. (end notes, resource list) (Nonfiction. 11-14)

Pub Date: Feb. 4, 2014

ISBN: 978-1-936976-49-2

Page Count: 224

Publisher: Zest Books

Review Posted Online: Nov. 13, 2013

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1, 2013

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An engaging, admiring, and insightful portrait of an uncompromising, civic-minded, visionary artist.

MAYA LIN

THINKING WITH HER HANDS

One of the world’s most celebrated creators of civic architecture is profiled in this accessible, engaging biography.

Similar in style and format to her Everybody Paints!: The Lives and Art of the Wyeth Family (2014) and Wideness and Wonder: The Life and Art of Georgia O’Keeffe (2011), Rubin’s well-researched profile examines the career, creative processes, and career milestones of Maya Lin. Rubin discusses at length Lin’s most famous achievement, designing the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. Chinese-American Lin was a reserved college student who entered and won the competition to design and build the memorial. Her youth and ethnicity were subjects of great controversy, and Rubin discusses how Lin fought to ensure her vision of the memorial remained intact. Other notable works by Lin, including the Civil Rights Memorial for the Southern Poverty Law Center in Montgomery, Alabama, a library and chapel for the Children’s Defense Fund, the Museum of Chinese in America, and the outdoor Wave Field project are examined but not in as much depth as the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. Attractively designed, the book is illustrated extensively with color photos and drawings.

An engaging, admiring, and insightful portrait of an uncompromising, civic-minded, visionary artist. (bibliography, source notes, index) (Biography. 12-15)

Pub Date: Nov. 7, 2017

ISBN: 978-1-4521-0837-7

Page Count: 112

Publisher: Chronicle

Review Posted Online: Aug. 21, 2017

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2017

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