A mature, expansive contemplation of wholeness and a highly satisfying read.

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TRACKING THE WILD WOMAN ARCHETYPE

A GUIDE TO BECOMING A WHOLE, IN-DIVISIBLE WOMAN

A gender study examines the “wild woman” archetype in the context of female sexuality and relationships.

Not a workbook, this debut volume is a meditation and guide incorporating poems, Jungian psychology, and Shelby’s own experiences and dreams. A clinical depth psychotherapist, the author criticizes the “self-help” movement as reinforcing the dominant paradigm of self-improvement, leading to detrimental practices (“Our addiction to the unreality of perfection is part of our culture’s current obsession with self-help strategies that are actually more harmful than helpful”). She argues instead for balancing the masculine and the feminine. She draws on polytheism and strives to capture the slippery and contradictory human and natural relationships—exploring daily necessities and sexuality in all of its expressions (including homosexuality and asexuality). Her sensitive probing of the wild woman archetype reveals it to be outside of the culture and the current ethos of women’s liberation. In Shelby’s view, the liberation movement comprises outspoken, aggressive women who employ the patriarchal caricature of strength (the hero myth) to compensate for earlier female passivity and helplessness. According to the author, such women may need to explore their vulnerabilities and “abdicate” their thrones. Since what is projected onto the outsider is a fascination found within oneself, this leads to an intriguing look at the anima-animus duality of the unconscious and the struggle to individualize and articulate sexuality and relationships. All of these elements cannot be fully grasped by the mind because this journey is “downward, incarnating into the body, the being, and into life.” Shelby masterfully draws on the current literature to inform her narrative and imagine the truly natural woman (or man) beyond the unspoken rules of power and the trends and buzzwords of resistance. While some may find some of the author’s assertions controversial, there are many “aha!” moments here for readers already on the path to individuation and steeped in Jungian symbols and Greek mythology. This is not a book for novices. In addition, there is no one path or method advocated here. The author’s prose at times approaches poetry yet acknowledges the daily challenges of work, children, and boredom.

A mature, expansive contemplation of wholeness and a highly satisfying read.

Pub Date: Jan. 22, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-63051-485-3

Page Count: 222

Publisher: Chiron Publications

Review Posted Online: Feb. 7, 2018

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Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis...

THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE

50TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION

Privately published by Strunk of Cornell in 1918 and revised by his student E. B. White in 1959, that "little book" is back again with more White updatings.

Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis (whoops — "A bankrupt expression") a unique guide (which means "without like or equal").

Pub Date: May 15, 1972

ISBN: 0205632645

Page Count: 105

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: Oct. 28, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1972

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Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

SEVERAL SHORT SENTENCES ABOUT WRITING

New York Times columnist and editorial board member delivers a slim book for aspiring writers, offering saws and sense, wisdom and waggery, biases and biting sarcasm.

Klinkenborg (Timothy; or, Notes of an Abject Reptile, 2006), who’s taught for decades, endeavors to keep things simple in his prose, and he urges other writers to do the same. (Note: He despises abuses of the word as, as he continually reminds readers.) In the early sections, the author ignores traditional paragraphing so that the text resembles a long free-verse poem. He urges readers to use short, clear sentences and to make sure each one is healthy before moving on; notes that it’s acceptable to start sentences with and and but; sees benefits in diagramming sentences; stresses that all writing is revision; periodically blasts the formulaic writing that many (most?) students learn in school; argues that knowing where you’re headed before you begin might be good for a vacation, but not for a piece of writing; and believes that writers must trust readers more, and trust themselves. Most of Klinkenborg’s advice is neither radical nor especially profound (“Turn to the poets. / Learn from them”), and the text suffers from a corrosive fallacy: that if his strategies work for him they will work for all. The final fifth of the text includes some passages from writers he admires (McPhee, Oates, Cheever) and some of his students’ awkward sentences, which he treats analytically but sometimes with a surprising sarcasm that veers near meanness. He includes examples of students’ dangling modifiers, malapropisms, errors of pronoun agreement, wordiness and other mistakes.

Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

Pub Date: Aug. 7, 2012

ISBN: 978-0-307-26634-7

Page Count: 224

Publisher: Knopf

Review Posted Online: May 14, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2012

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