PEOPLE OF THE SACRED ARROW by Stan Hoig

PEOPLE OF THE SACRED ARROW

The Southern Cheyenne Today
Age Range: 11 & up
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KIRKUS REVIEW

 Pressed on all sides by white values and culture, the Southern Cheyenne (now located in western Oklahoma) attempt to keep their tribal integrity in the face of poverty, racism, and misunderstanding, working hard to keep tribal history alive, to protect their children from less positive white influences, and to sponsor a renewal of ceremonies and gatherings. Basing his narrative largely on interviews, an author of adult books on the Cheyenne (Sand Creek Massacre, 1961) reviews highlights of their history: great peacemaker chiefs like Black Kettle; massacres at the hands of such generals as Custer; ceremonies and heroes of the present. At first, the Cheyenne welcomed whites, and they still believe in sharing what they have to the point of poverty; they live closely and worshipfully with nature, but their hunting and guiding skills are obsolete. Though sometimes repetitive (e.g., in the many interviews with schoolchildren), Hoig's book shines in describing ceremonies today and in grappling intelligently with the larger question of how we relate to people with essentially different value systems. B&w photos; bibliography; map; index. (Nonfiction. 11+)

Pub Date: Sept. 1st, 1992
ISBN: 0-525-65088-1
Page count: 130pp
Publisher: Dutton
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1st, 1992