BATAAN -- THE MARCH OF DEATH by Stanley Falk

BATAAN -- THE MARCH OF DEATH

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Legion are the news stories, articles, legends and other references to the ""Death March"" of captured U.S. and Fillipino troops under the Japanese in April of . This book attempts -- and generally succeeds--- in telling the brutal history of the march without hysterias and with the objective consideration for both sides. The story begins with Gen. Edward King's surrender of nearly 100,000 troops and civilian on Bataan. Tired, sick and exhausted, that vast body of men were to march by different routes in Balanga, from were they would be taken to a prison camp in San Fernamio. The Japanese tried to make provision for them but underestimated the size of the group, and also found their own army short on food and medical supplies. There was no consistency in the way the men were treated on the march. Many were kicked, beaten, or slaughtered in large groups. Others however were given as decent treatment as the Japanese could afford. How thousands died both on the march and at , and how the news finally reached the U.S. to infuriate the American people, makes dramatic and tragic . The author finds however that maltreatment was an individual matter not one condoned by the Japanese Army---and that the blame lay in individual areas. Very readable.

Pub Date: Sept. 1st, 1962
Publisher: Norton