Kirkus Stars & Recommendations

IN DEFENSE OF A LIBERAL EDUCATION by Fareed Zakaria
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 30, 2015

"A passionate appeal, for Americans in particular and the world at large, to rethink the benefits of a well-rounded, general education."
Why Americans should continue to embrace a well-rounded education. Read full book review >
MURDER AT CIREY by Cheryl Sawyer
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: March 30, 2015

"A promising start in a new direction featuring a headstrong but street-smart detective."
This exhilarating first stab at a murder mystery by veteran historical novelist Sawyer (Rebel, 2014, etc.) rings true. Read full book review >

THE CEMETERY BOYS by Heather Brewer
Released: March 30, 2015

"A slick, spooky, chilling mystery. (Horror. 12-16)"
Stephen's family returns to his father's hometown in search of a fresh start, but the town's dark history threatens to swallow them whole. Read full book review >
A Wolf at the Gate by Mark Van Steenwyk
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 28, 2015

"A visually stunning work addressing themes of peace, generosity, and forgiveness."
Van Steenwyk (The Unkingdom of God, 2013, etc.) offers an illustrated chapter book about an angry red wolf who encounters a saintly beggar king. Read full book review >
VOYAGE OF THE BASILISK by Marie Brennan
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 27, 2015

"Fans of this charming series won't be disappointed."
Third in Brennan's fine natural-history fantasy series, set six years after the events detailed in The Tropic of Serpents (2014).Read full book review >

CUCKOO by Nick Davies
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: March 26, 2015

"'My hope is that this reads like a nature detective story,' writes Davies. He has achieved his goal and more in this fascinating study of 'an evolutionary arms race.'"
Davies (Behavioral Ecology/Univ. of Cambridge; Cambridge Cuckoos, Cowbirds and Other Cheats, 2000, etc.) chronicles his 30-year attempt to solve what he calls "an enduring puzzle: how does the cuckoo get away with such outrageous behavior?"Read full book review >
AFTER MIND by Spencer Wolf
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 25, 2015

"A rewarding tesseract of a novel that doesn't release its secrets easily."
A sci-fi debut about a boy who's deathly afraid of water and the family who helps reconstruct his mind after a tragic accident. Read full book review >
SURVIVING BEAR ISLAND by Paul Greci
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 25, 2015

"Bear Island is a challenging environment to survive but a terrific thrill on the page. (Adventure. 9-14)"
A fateful kayaking trip forces Tom to grow up fast while he faces dangers he only ever dreamed about. Read full book review >
THE STRANGER by Harlan Coben
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: March 24, 2015

"Coben can always be relied on to generate thrills from the simplest premises, but his finest tales maintain a core of logic throughout the twists. This 100-proof nightmare ranks among his most potent."
Another one of Coben's got-it-all New Jersey dads finds out that his wonderful wife has been hiding a whopper of a secret from him—a secret whose trail leads to even more monstrous revelations. Read full book review >
MAISY'S TRACTOR by Lucy Cousins
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 24, 2015

"Well done, Maisy! Keep up the good work. (Board book. 6 mos.-3)"
Hop on the tractor for a busy day on the farm with the unflappable Maisy. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 24, 2015

"An earnest, eye-opening, important account for Western readers."
A brave, excoriating exposé of the systematic ruination of resource-rich countries of Africa, leaving "penury and strife" for its millions of inhabitants. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: March 24, 2015

"A fine addition to the single-issue science genre."
"From tropical rain forests to alpine meadows and arctic tundra, seed plants dominate landscapes and define ecosystems." In fact, they make up more than 90 percent of land flora. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >