Book Recommendations & Reviews, Highly, Good, Top | Kirkus Reviews

IN DEFENSE OF A LIBERAL EDUCATION by Fareed Zakaria
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 30, 2015

"A passionate appeal, for Americans in particular and the world at large, to rethink the benefits of a well-rounded, general education."
Why Americans should continue to embrace a well-rounded education. Read full book review >
MURDER AT CIREY by Cheryl Sawyer
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: March 30, 2015

"A promising start in a new direction featuring a headstrong but street-smart detective."
This exhilarating first stab at a murder mystery by veteran historical novelist Sawyer (Rebel, 2014, etc.) rings true. Read full book review >

THE HARDER THEY COME by T.C. Boyle
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 30, 2015

"Boyle's vision and ambition remain compelling, though his characters here seem like plot devices."
Violence corrodes the ideal of freedom in an ambitious novel that aims to illuminate the dark underbelly of the American dream. Read full book review >
ETHERWORLD by Claudia Gabel
Released: March 30, 2015

"This sequel feels like it's under new management, its enticing high concept abandoned by the wayside all dressed up with no place to go. (Science fiction. 14-17)"
Safe for now behind the firewall in Elusion, the dangerously addictive virtual-reality experience Regan's dad designed, she and Josh join the race to dismantle it before its mass-market release. Read full book review >
SOLITAIRE by Alice Oseman
Released: March 30, 2015

"Still, Oseman's novel will be popular with those who worship Holden. (Fiction. 14-18)"
This debut novel evokes a classic to present a girl searching for something true. Read full book review >

GET MOONED by Chris Pallace
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: March 30, 2015

"Those in search of a humorous, high-interest title that will especially appeal to boys need look no further—and a projected sequel will continue the madcap adventures. (Adventure. 8-12)"
Meet Joey and Johnny—two students at Kick Foot Academy, "the world's premier ninja school," who are as irreverent, bumbling and hilarious as they come. Read full book review >
KING by Ellen Oh
Released: March 30, 2015

"This finale is recommended only for completists. (map, glossary) (Fantasy. 13-16)"
In the conclusion to the Prophecy trilogy, Kira must decide if she can fully embrace her destiny as the Dragon Musado. Read full book review >
THE CEMETERY BOYS by Heather Brewer
Released: March 30, 2015

"A slick, spooky, chilling mystery. (Horror. 12-16)"
Stephen's family returns to his father's hometown in search of a fresh start, but the town's dark history threatens to swallow them whole. Read full book review >
A Wolf at the Gate by Mark Van Steenwyk
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 28, 2015

"A visually stunning work addressing themes of peace, generosity, and forgiveness."
Van Steenwyk (The Unkingdom of God, 2013, etc.) offers an illustrated chapter book about an angry red wolf who encounters a saintly beggar king. Read full book review >
THE HOMEPORT JOURNALS by A. C. Burch
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 27, 2015

"An often vivid portrait of Provincetown life and May-December friendships, despite a bland main character."
An elderly woman and her troupe of gay live-ins take in a young man running from a bad romance in Burch's debut novel. Read full book review >
VOYAGE OF THE BASILISK by Marie Brennan
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 27, 2015

"Fans of this charming series won't be disappointed."
Third in Brennan's fine natural-history fantasy series, set six years after the events detailed in The Tropic of Serpents (2014).Read full book review >
FOUR YEARS IN THE MOUNTAINS OF KURDISTAN by Aram Haigaz
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 26, 2015

"A richly detailed testimony to a young man's courage in the face of unspeakable horror."
An account of tragic years in Armenian history. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >