Kirkus Reviews Stars & Recommendations

THE WORLD TO COME by Jim Shepard
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 24, 2017

"A stylist whose fictional expansiveness underscores his singularity."
Shepard's fifth story collection—his first book since his well-received novel, The Book of Aron (2015), which was a Kirkus Prize finalist—demonstrates why he's a writer who defies categorization. Read full book review >
HOMO DEUS by Yuval Noah Harari
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"A relentlessly fascinating book that is sure to become—and deserves to be—a bestseller."
In an intellectually provocative follow-up to Sapiens (2015), Harari (History/Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem) looks to the future. Read full book review >

ANTOINETTE by Kelly DiPucchio
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"A reassuring tale that celebrates the uniqueness of each dog (or person) and the creation of a purposeful life. Three cheers for the winning Antoinette, who 'could not—would not—give up!' (Picture book. 2-7)"
The beloved puppies of Gaston (2014) are back, this time with Antoinette's story of self-discovery as she reveals that every dog has a gift to share. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"The Robbins controversy featured arguments about alien rights, asylum, national identity, and the meaning and scope of American citizenship, all of which persist and all of which Ekirch handles with remarkable dexterity."
A historian revisits a little-remembered incident, the murderous 1797 mutiny aboard HMS Hermione, and traces its startling ramifications. Read full book review >
ENCIRCLING by Carl Frode Tiller
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"A poised and effective Rashomon-style exploration of multiple psyches."
One man's amnesia prompts divergent and sometimes-conflicting remembrances from those close to him. Read full book review >

UNWARRANTED by Barry Friedman
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"At once creative and conservative, Friedman offers a timely blueprint for recovering democratic control of local and national law enforcement."
A law professor diagnoses the ills of American policing and prescribes a healthy dose of sunlight. Read full book review >
CONVERGENCE by Peter Watson
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"Those who reject the idea of convergence outright may not get far in this book, but readers with no objection to a sweeping, entirely fascinating history of science during the last 200 years will find an abundance of enlightening material."
The journalist and polymath delivers a delightful exploration of "the deepest idea in the universe." Read full book review >
LAST DAY ON EARTH by Eric Puchner
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"Without fundamentally challenging the traditional short story structure, the author finds a way to bend it to suit a skewed and fantastic vision of the world."
The nine stories in this collection by Puchner (Model Home, 2010, etc.) range from the domestic to the surreal. Read full book review >
THE TIME MUSEUM by Matthew Loux
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"A first rate kickoff: fresh, fast, and funny. (Graphic science fiction. 10-13)"
Both deadly dangers and exciting research opportunities await science-mad Delia Bean once she stumbles into a museum with portals to any time and place on Earth. Read full book review >
GUNMETAL GRAY by Mark Greaney
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"At about 500 pages, this one is fat, fast, and fun. Clancy's spirit lives on."
The latest high-energy entry in the Gray Man series (Back Blast, 2016, etc.). Read full book review >
WHY I AM NOT A FEMINIST by Jessa Crispin
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"Forget busting glass ceilings. Crispin has taken a wrecking ball to the whole structure."
A taut and spirited attack on contemporary mainstream feminism. Read full book review >
BEAUTIFUL BROKEN GIRLS by Kim Savage
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"Haunting and mesmerizing. (Fiction. 14 & up)"
After two sisters commit suicide, the boy next door traces the notes one left behind for him. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >