SPICY FOOD by Stendhal

SPICY FOOD

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Fiery food aficionados will find few surprises among this collection of predictable favorites drawn primarily from the cuisines of South America, Southeast Asia, and the Caribbean. The appetizer and soup chapters are particularly disappointing (unless one has a sudden craving for cocktail weiners in mustard sauce, or yet another gazpacho). However, the introductory comments about spices include imaginative formulas for spice blends such as curries, salts, and meat pastes, and there is a separate chapter devoted to recipes for zesty sauces, marinades, and prepared butters; any of these ""extras"" could be adapted interestingly to other dishes. Cooking instructions are straightforward and clear, even when a dish sounds complicated, such as Carne de Vinha d'Alhos (Hawaiian pickled pork) or Enjera (Ethiopian lace pancakes, served with a chicken and ginger saut‚). Those who cannot resist the vagaries of curries will want this book, if only to sample Stendhal's version--from Fiji.

Pub Date: Oct. 25th, 1979
Publisher: Holt, Rinehart & Winston