JACQUELINE BOUVIER KENNEDY ONASSIS by Stephen Birmingham

JACQUELINE BOUVIER KENNEDY ONASSIS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

What's in the names? Cachet-conscious Stephen Birmingham may not know much more than the rest of us about ""the most famous woman in the world,"" but he knows all about her family connections. In his scenario, dashing wastrel Jack Bouvier marries pert, steely, not-so-well-born Janet Lee, loses money (that blasted Joe Kennedy at the SEC), and has to ask his disapproving father-in-law for help. Easy-come Jack and just-so Janet split up, starting a lifelong rivalry for daughter Jackie's affections. Daddy gives her gala occasions, teaches her how to dress and enter a room and remain aloof--but Mummy in time marries very rich, very nice ""Hughdie"" Auchincloss, of Newport and Virginia. Daddy fumes: a plot to get her away from him! But Jackie is growing up, learning ""to run her own show."" At Vassar, she's an Ivy League legend; at her wedding to Jack Kennedy, she's not in traditional white; on her first day as First Lady, she never does join the multi-family party. More: when she discovers Jack's dalliances--and her celebrity-value to him--she asserts her independence. So why not a restful cruise on the Onassis yacht when baby Patrick dies? Birmingham, who sees her cannily stage-managing JFK's funeral and marrying Onassis to thumb her nose at the public (not only, as Mummy's insecure girl, for his money), has only the nicest things to say about Jackie as a mother. He'll also tell you about her kids, her household, her job, and that radiant, armored smile. For those who really care.

Pub Date: Sept. 27th, 1978
Publisher: Grosset & Dunlap