PRINCIPLES OF ART APPRECIATION by Stephen C. Pepper

PRINCIPLES OF ART APPRECIATION

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This is an excellent introduction to enjoyment of art, written by the chairman of the art department and professor of philosophy and aesthetics of the University of California. While Pepper does not himself advocate the mechanist theory of aesthetics which stresses the value of pleasure in art, and is known for his studies on the subject from contrary angles, that is the viewpoint he adopts in this study as the easiest and least controversial approach for the average layman. He analyzes the psychology of art appreciation, the formation of likes and dislikes, the general aesthetic principles of design, pattern, type and emotion. He then turns to the materials employed by the visual arts in carrying out these general principles and the ways in which they appeal to human likes:- color, line, mass and volume. In conclusion, he discusses the three visual arts,- painting, sculpture, architecture, on the basis of the general principles at work, the materials used, and the pleasure they give. The twenty plates at the end of the text are constantly referred to an illustration of various points made. These plates- four of them in full color- are all-inclusive,-modern and classical, painting, sculpture, architecture,-demonstrative of the phases studied in the text. Throughout the text spot drawings, in line, diagrams, etc. are used. The material is well organized, though perhaps a trifle pedagogical in presentation. Of more interest to the student than to the general reader.

Pub Date: May 5th, 1949
Publisher: Harcourt, Brace