LIFE IN A NARROW PLACE by Stephen Hirst

LIFE IN A NARROW PLACE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A dry, detailed report on Arizona's Havasupai Indians and their history from the 1860s when the US government first confined them to their summer dwelling place in the Havasu canyon until 1974 when, with the help of Barry Goldwater and Morris Udall and over the protests of the National Forest and Park Services, the Sierra Club and the Friends of the Earth, they finally won a persistent but always peaceable battle for the restoration of their traditional pasture land. A long chapter records the everyday activities of one representative (though far from typical) couple; most of the rest chronicles a succession of treaties, surveys, proclamations, petitions, settlements, bills, and amendments. Sympathetic, in-depth documentation of a case that speaks for itself--though both Hirst's style and his assumptions of background knowledge suggest that this was not written with young readers in mind.

Pub Date: April 1st, 1976
Publisher: McKay