THE THEORY AND PRACTICE OF GAMESMANSHIP by Stephen Potter

THE THEORY AND PRACTICE OF GAMESMANSHIP

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Although a predisposition toward British humor is a valuable asset in appreciating this invaluable ""Art of Winning Games Without Actually Cheating"", there is nothing to scare off any games' participant who has decided he can talk his opponent out of winning. There are finely scored opening gambits, well developed ploys and doubletake stratagems to defeat the best player of any sports, card, ball or table activities, by the howlingest amateur interested only in winning (without sacrificing any fraction of sportsmanship). Would you make a flurry, or clothesmanship, or nice chapmanship, or guestship, or drinkship, would you employ the hampers or the variety of openings suggested, you can take your place in golf, chess, bridge, rugger (well, we said it was British, didn't we?), billiards, squash rackets, tennis, cricket -- and outscore any better qualified opponent. With a wily tongue, in a beautiful check, the true and complete story of gamesmanship, together with stories of its founders, and the development of its rules, accompanied with worrisome diagrams and illustrations, this succeeds most angelically in applying psychological warfare to social, athletic, mental contests. Plus sale (if a bit expensive) for an audience that will admit its special humor. And it really IS funny!

Pub Date: July 12th, 1948
Publisher: Holt