A friendly, practical, easy-to-read road map that may indeed take some of the sting out of an alarming cancer diagnosis.

CANCER

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

A radiation oncologist and health researcher provides counsel on navigating one of the most feared maladies in modern medicine.

As devastating and derailing as a cancer diagnosis can be, debut author Rosenberg recognizes the urgent need for information and sound, patient-centered advice that is devoid of confusing jargon and mistruths. “We’ve all been touched by cancer,” he writes, categorizing it as the second most common cause of death (behind heart disease). The guidebook focuses on processes and treatments and seeks to arm patients with a useful “flashlight in the darkness of cancer information.” Delivering concise data in straightforward, readable language, the author begins with an overview of cancer cells, using basic biology to describe their framework; how the disease functions and grows; and the intricate hijacking process employed to mutate and replicate within host organs and tissues. Other chapters detail diagnosis criteria through scans and biopsies and how best to mitigate risk factors like family genetics and environmental exposures. He also stresses the importance of prime self-care support options to address the disease’s physical and emotional tolls. The myriad of treatment options and alternative integrative therapies form the most significant chapters in the manual, as they directly pertain to a patient’s curative path and future quality of life. A chapter on boosting one’s vitality through diet and lifestyle during therapy is also invaluable. While some of Rosenberg’s advice could be considered pedestrian, for readers in times of bodily crisis they will serve as priceless reminders on maintaining and preserving optimal health. He urges everyone involved to never be afraid to ask questions or seek a second opinion. Rosenberg also outlines what he considers the top 10 mistakes patients can make upon receiving a diagnosis involving cancer, such as not knowing what type and stage they have and failing to remain attentive to overall personal wellness before, during, and after treatment. A concluding glossary and resource list round out Rosenberg’s impressive continuum of patient care for cancer sufferers searching for cleareyed guidance and compassionate clinical direction.

A friendly, practical, easy-to-read road map that may indeed take some of the sting out of an alarming cancer diagnosis.

Pub Date: Nov. 6, 2017

ISBN: 978-0-9992774-0-9

Page Count: -

Publisher: CreateSpace

Review Posted Online: Oct. 4, 2017

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 15, 2017

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Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis...

THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE

50TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION

Privately published by Strunk of Cornell in 1918 and revised by his student E. B. White in 1959, that "little book" is back again with more White updatings.

Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis (whoops — "A bankrupt expression") a unique guide (which means "without like or equal").

Pub Date: May 15, 1972

ISBN: 0205632645

Page Count: 105

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: Oct. 28, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1972

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IN MY PLACE

From the national correspondent for PBS's MacNeil-Lehrer Newshour: a moving memoir of her youth in the Deep South and her role in desegregating the Univ. of Georgia. The eldest daughter of an army chaplain, Hunter-Gault was born in what she calls the ``first of many places that I would call `my place' ''—the small village of Due West, tucked away in a remote little corner of South Carolina. While her father served in Korea, Hunter-Gault and her mother moved first to Covington, Georgia, and then to Atlanta. In ``L.A.'' (lovely Atlanta), surrounded by her loving family and a close-knit black community, the author enjoyed a happy childhood participating in activities at church and at school, where her intellectual and leadership abilities soon were noticed by both faculty and peers. In high school, Hunter-Gault found herself studying the ``comic-strip character Brenda Starr as I might have studied a journalism textbook, had there been one.'' Determined to be a journalist, she applied to several colleges—all outside of Georgia, for ``to discourage the possibility that a black student would even think of applying to one of those white schools, the state provided money for black students'' to study out of state. Accepted at Michigan's Wayne State, the author was encouraged by local civil-rights leaders to apply, along with another classmate, to the Univ. of Georgia as well. Her application became a test of changing racial attitudes, as well as of the growing strength of the civil-rights movement in the South, and Gault became a national figure as she braved an onslaught of hostilities and harassment to become the first black woman to attend the university. A remarkably generous, fair-minded account of overcoming some of the biggest, and most intractable, obstacles ever deployed by southern racists. (Photographs—not seen.)

Pub Date: Nov. 1, 1992

ISBN: 0-374-17563-2

Page Count: 192

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 1992

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