STUDENTS, SCHOLARS AND PARENTS by Stephen White

STUDENTS, SCHOLARS AND PARENTS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Subtitled: ""An exploration of the ideas behind the new math and other curriculum reform."" Mr. White is an expert proselytizer for change in early childhood education methods, particularly for the new math now encountering emotional resistance among parents. Perhaps ""propagandist"" would be a better designation for White's technique; amost immediately he sidles up to the reader with a ""them against us"" ploy. ""Them"" is that great sitting duck, the specialist in education. This line always appeals to the sort of minds that are sure they know better than any teacher or teacher of teachers. This sort is also likely to be the most shook up over the fact that their children aren't being drilled in arithmetic. Gradually, for those who stick with the very brief book, White introduces the concepts and goals of the new math. And, he does come full circle to fair reasoning with his final references to how hard it is to achieve a coordinated curriculum when radical changes are being proposed by all the disciplines. His very short statement on the impact of the changes on those outside the academically oriented middle class is provocative and lifts the reader from personal to societal concerns. It reads more easily than Allan-doerfer's Mathematics for Parents (1964, p. 1195) which sought to promote acceptance while teaching the new math, too. Judiciously recommended in communities primed to go rampaging back to the days and ways of McGuffey, the book could become a persuasive deterrent.

Pub Date: Feb. 4th, 1965
Publisher: Doubleday