DAYS WITH BERNARD SHAW by Stephen Winsten
Kirkus Star

DAYS WITH BERNARD SHAW

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KIRKUS REVIEW

These conversations here, which took place between Shaw and the Winstens through the war years, are recorded with both fidelity and fondness, hold personal and literary interest. Shaw, now in his 80's, is still the familiar figure, paradoxical, arbitrary, argumentative, irreverent, mischievous and at all times sustaining the Shavian legend. But indirectly, there are interlinear indications which point up the pathos of the aging man who fears that he may be forgotten, will not admit the loneliness of these later years- particularly after the death of his wife which took place during this period. In these interchanges with Stephen and Clare Winsten at Ayot Saint Lawrence (""an island of quiet""), you will hear Shaw as he expresses himself on children, atheism, his domestic habits and his domestication by his wife, on vegetarianism, on his wealth, and his penury, on the war- ""Don't worry, if the British can survive their meals, they can survive anything"".... A memoir which forms part of a literary legend, offers both intellectual stimulation and amusement.

Publisher: Vanguard