STATION BREAK

A go-getting TV reporter crosses paths, twice, with a megalomaniac white-supremacist in TV news exec Friedman's supremely silly debut novel. Everybody knows workaholic San Francisco newsperson Mary Reed is a comer; she's ``not unkind, only a little selfish'' in her exclusive attention to her career (snubbed friends, neglected boyfriend, etc.). But little does she know how much that career will depend on right- wing messiah Jerry Radamacker's New Brotherhood, which moves smartly from paramilitary training in the desert to grand theft, counterfeiting, and terrorism without the slightest nod toward plausibility. When the New Brotherhood's people inside the Presidio turn an FBI sting operation into a raging inferno that Mary's lucky enough to cover live, and when she parlays a series of swaggering phone calls from Radamacker into an exclusive on-camera interview (Radamacker's masked, but will she recognize him if they meet again?) and ends up in the slammer for keeping her sources confidential, her name-recognition skyrockets: she's wined and dined by a high-powered L.A. agent, wooed by the big-time L.A. outlet, and launched on her way to four Emmys and an unheard-of co-anchor slot on the 6:00 L.A. news. Meanwhile, distantly pursued by dogged Bakersfield homicide dick Eddie Martinez, Radamacker and his racist buddies plot the end of American civilization. The burning question: What impact will their nefarious plans—botulism, anthrax, cyanide, phony $100 bills—have on Mary's career when they storm the studio for the story of her life? Tediously irrelevant (though presumably authentic) tidbits about news broadcasting alternate with novelettish descriptions of people you don't care about, cluttered and unconvincing action sequences, and limp parallels between Armageddon and a bad-hair day. Keep the remote handy.

Pub Date: March 22, 1993

ISBN: 0-312-08895-7

Page Count: 320

Publisher: St. Martin's

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 1993

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The phrase “tour de force” could have been invented for this audacious novel.

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A LITTLE LIFE

Four men who meet as college roommates move to New York and spend the next three decades gaining renown in their professions—as an architect, painter, actor and lawyer—and struggling with demons in their intertwined personal lives.

Yanagihara (The People in the Trees, 2013) takes the still-bold leap of writing about characters who don’t share her background; in addition to being male, JB is African-American, Malcolm has a black father and white mother, Willem is white, and “Jude’s race was undetermined”—deserted at birth, he was raised in a monastery and had an unspeakably traumatic childhood that’s revealed slowly over the course of the book. Two of them are gay, one straight and one bisexual. There isn’t a single significant female character, and for a long novel, there isn’t much plot. There aren’t even many markers of what’s happening in the outside world; Jude moves to a loft in SoHo as a young man, but we don’t see the neighborhood change from gritty artists’ enclave to glitzy tourist destination. What we get instead is an intensely interior look at the friends’ psyches and relationships, and it’s utterly enthralling. The four men think about work and creativity and success and failure; they cook for each other, compete with each other and jostle for each other’s affection. JB bases his entire artistic career on painting portraits of his friends, while Malcolm takes care of them by designing their apartments and houses. When Jude, as an adult, is adopted by his favorite Harvard law professor, his friends join him for Thanksgiving in Cambridge every year. And when Willem becomes a movie star, they all bask in his glow. Eventually, the tone darkens and the story narrows to focus on Jude as the pain of his past cuts deep into his carefully constructed life.  

The phrase “tour de force” could have been invented for this audacious novel.

Pub Date: March 10, 2015

ISBN: 978-0-385-53925-8

Page Count: 720

Publisher: Doubleday

Review Posted Online: Dec. 22, 2014

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 2015

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Laymon moves us dazzlingly (and sometimes bewilderingly) from 1964 to 1985 to 2013 and incorporates themes of prejudice,...

LONG DIVISION

A novel within a novel—hilarious, moving and occasionally dizzying.

Citoyen “City” Coldson is a 14-year-old wunderkind when it comes to crafting sentences. In fact, his only rival is his classmate LaVander Peeler. Although the two don’t get along, they’ve qualified to appear on the national finals of the contest "Can You Use That Word in a Sentence," and each is determined to win. Unfortunately, on the nationally televised show, City is given the word “niggardly” and, to say the least, does not provide a “correct, appropriate or dynamic usage” of the word as the rules require. LaVander similarly blows his chance with the word “chitterlings,” so both are humiliated, City the more so since his appearance is available to all on YouTube. This leads to a confrontation with his grandmother, alas for City, “the greatest whupper in the history of Mississippi whuppings.” Meanwhile, the principal at City’s school has given him a book entitled Long Division. When City begins to read this, he discovers that the main character is named City Coldson, and he’s in love with a Shalaya Crump...but this is in 1985, and the contest finals occurred in 2013. (Laymon is nothing if not contemporary.) A girl named Baize Shephard also appears in the novel City is reading, though in 2013, she has mysteriously disappeared a few weeks before City’s humiliation. Laymon cleverly interweaves his narrative threads and connects characters in surprising and seemingly impossible ways.

Laymon moves us dazzlingly (and sometimes bewilderingly) from 1964 to 1985 to 2013 and incorporates themes of prejudice, confusion and love rooted in an emphatically post-Katrina world.

Pub Date: June 15, 2013

ISBN: 978-1-932841-72-5

Page Count: 250

Publisher: Bolden/Agate

Review Posted Online: March 14, 2013

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 2013

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