WHO FIRED THE FIRST SHOT by

WHO FIRED THE FIRST SHOT

By
Age Range: 1861 - 65
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KIRKUS REVIEW

Originally published in part in the Saturday Evening Post's centennial series on the Civil War, this account of the human side of the fight by a southerner offers refreshing relief from the great generals, great battles, and great movements of men which Civil War literature usually concerns itself with. Beginning with historical considerations of the thesis that ""slavery was a moral wrong but a Constitutional right"" the author takes us to Fort Sumter in April, 1861, and the beginning of the fight. He tells who the commanders and gunners were, and how in 33 hours they threw thousands of shells at each other without killing anybody. From there we meet eccentric generals, the kinds of fighting and the kinds of weapons encountered, the role of Indian troops, the savagery of massacres and prison camps (both sides had equally cruel prison systems), the role of religion among the men, the brutality and the humor---in fact all the things large and small which make up a war. An unusual portrait of the human beings who fought each other from 1861-65, this book is a must for any Civil War library.

Pub Date: June 4th, 1962
Publisher: Hawthorn