CONTRARY WOODROW by Sue Felt
Kirkus Star

CONTRARY WOODROW

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Red-headed children are traditionally spirited. Woodrow was no exception though his spiritedness was essentially expressed in a form of unique perversity. And when Woodrow is shipped off to kindergarten, he does not, as his family hopes, become more docile. No, true to form, Woodrow contrarily breaks down the other childrens' block projects, throws his clothes on the floor, gets into his suit backwards, and resolutely refuses to pay attention. Only on Valentine's day, when Woodrow almost is left out of the class festivity does Woodrow change, and in an outburst of positive enthusiasm, is no longer contrary. A funny story, brightly illustrated by the author, which young children will care about and understand

Pub Date: Aug. 21st, 1958
Publisher: Doubleday