An amusing riff on an old favorite that’ll please many little ones.

READ REVIEW

THE WHEELS ON THE...UH-OH!

The wheel on the bus goes bust.

A red bus filled with all sorts of anthropomorphic animals is chugging along when suddenly: “BANG! Uh-oh!” One of the tires has been punctured, stopping the bus in its tracks. “The driver on the bus says, ‘Off, off, off,’ ” and “the handywoman’s wrench goes click, clack, click” as the text continues in tune with the famous song and the animals figure out what to do with a broken bus. Little readers familiar with the “Wheels on the Bus” will love this new spin on the standard, and caregivers will certainly appreciate a variation on a song they’ve sung more times than they can count. The illustrations are drawn and colored with simplicity, presenting the series of events as plainly as possible in double-page spreads that pull back wide for full view of vehicles and some of the bus’s larger patrons. The animals are a diverse lot, and Willmore has fun with the license granted by the decision to clothe them, painting purple bears and bunnies, a pink hippo, and a blue elephant. The handywoman with her wrench is an extra nice touch, but it’s too bad she doesn’t actually fix that flat.

An amusing riff on an old favorite that’ll please many little ones. (Picture book. 3-5)

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 2018

ISBN: 978-0-8075-8869-7

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Whitman

Review Posted Online: May 28, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2018

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

A picture-book favorite despite minor flaws? That’s a 10-4, good buddy.

TEENY TINY TRUCKS

In McCanna and Frawley’s cheery picture-book debut, miniscule vehicles drive into supersized action.

Accompanied by a bouncy rhyme, several brightly colored trucks rumble through the garden: the lead red-and-blue truck, the more feminine purple truck and the gridlock-loathing aqua truck. Though the color palette and cartoon appearance of the nameless vehicles may seem like a carbon copy of Disney’s Cars (2006), illustrator Frawley has included humorous details for each truck, giving them life beyond their big-screen predecessors. For instance, the red-and-blue truck has jaunty eyebrows created from roof lights, the purple truck’s short bursts of steam look like daisies, and the aqua truck’s expressive eyebrows are actually wiper blades. The illustrations help tell a hilarious story, most notably of a traffic jam featuring a frog, slug and worm who are clearly not amused by the crowded garden path. McCanna similarly handles the text well. The rhythmic pattern is clear, most of the rhyme is spot-on—“Teeny tiny tires. With teeny tiny treads. / Leaving teeny tiny trails between the flower beds”—and the story begs to be read aloud to a group. Typical trucker talk is included in the dialogue—“Breaker breaker, Buddy!” “What’s your twenty, Friend?”—and the lingo is explained in a short glossary at the end of the story. Though the premise is amusing, the proportion of the trucks in relation to their surroundings can be a bit inconsistent. Most images depict the trucks, which are “smaller than a dime,” as being only marginally bigger than ants and bees, yet other images portray the trucks as being much larger—almost half as long as a box of animal crackers. Nevertheless, this delightful story will charm truck-loving children.

A picture-book favorite despite minor flaws? That’s a 10-4, good buddy.

Pub Date: Oct. 15, 2013

ISBN: 978-0989668811

Page Count: 24

Publisher: Little Bahalia Publishing

Review Posted Online: Dec. 5, 2013

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

Not Maisy’s finest exploit but likely to excite an “ARRRR!” or two from scurvy knavelets who can’t get enough of the...

MAISY'S PIRATE SHIP

A POP-UP-AND-PLAY BOOK

Avast! On a pop-up pirate ship, punch-out figures of Capt. Maisy and her crew set sail in search of a treasure chest (also punch-out).

More toy than tale, this alternative to Maisy’s Pirate Treasure Hunt (2004) offers perfunctory scene setting on three opening spreads before getting to the main event: on a base designed to lie flat, a two-piece ship with unfolding sails beneath a pair of big flaps. Budding buccaneers can peer into the vessel’s nether regions through the split as well as place the four figurines either on board or into a punch-out dinghy. All four figurines, along with several nondetachable crewmates, are attired in properly piratical garb save an elephant who models skull-and-crossbones patterned shorts. An inset pocket provides handy storage for the loose parts when it’s time to close the covers.

Not Maisy’s finest exploit but likely to excite an “ARRRR!” or two from scurvy knavelets who can’t get enough of the redoubtable rodent. (Pop-up playscape. 3-5)

Pub Date: Sept. 8, 2015

ISBN: 978-0-7636-7941-5

Page Count: 10

Publisher: Candlewick

Review Posted Online: May 18, 2015

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1, 2015

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet
more