TWICE TAKEN by Susan Beth Pfeffer

TWICE TAKEN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Robbed of her Saturday evening to babysit her dad's date's obnoxious kids, Brooke, 16, responds to a TV search for ""Amy,"" kidnapped by her father 11 years ago. She dials the 800 number knowing that she is Amy but unprepared for the consequences: Within minutes, police take her into protective custody; her mother and nice stepfather, who seem like strangers, drive all night to arrive Sunday morning; on Monday, a judge returns her to her mother's custody with a two-year proscription against seeing or telephoning Dad (who raised her conscientiously and whose love she returns); she is moved to a home where a mother she doesn't know what to call presses an embarrassing number of new clothes on her, better than Dad could afford. The scenario is an attention grabber, Amy's narrative moves smoothly, and Pfeffer does get the issues right: Amy comes to understand her stepsibs' jealousy and her own feelings about their relationship with a mother she wasn't allowed to know, and she discovers and expresses her anger at Dad's irreparable action. Unfortunately, simplistic characterizations undermine the story's credibility; Amy is unbelievably understanding and forbearing, her mother oblivious to the effects of her life's second disruption on her long-lost daughter. A swift read that will draw its target audience, but shallow.

Pub Date: June 1st, 1994
Page count: 200pp
Publisher: Delacorte