A poetic, attentive and often rich collection.

IN THE LOOP OF EARTH AND SKY

Meditative reflections on life, spirituality and nature.

In this slim, lyrical volume, Richane examines her life experiences, framed by the changing of the seasons and the transformation of the natural world. Beginning with the assertion that “the mundane and the profound are seldom far apart,” the author presents a series of one- to two-page chapters meditating on the role of the mystical in everyday things. Birth and family feature heavily, as several chapters reflect on her newborn grandson and his connection to other members of her family. Most chapters, however, are relatively disconnected, from a narrative perspective, and don’t elucidate a central theme so much as they circle around it. Social justice does feature prominently, though, with recurring mentions of global poverty, the environment, racism and gay rights. The book never becomes overtly political, although Richane’s spirituality dovetails with her politics in lines such as, “Hope lies in knowing we have what it takes to inch forward, with halting, clumsy, very human efforts. The question becomes: does this act move us toward the world we desire?” Her spirituality remains more or less undefined, but her mentions of Advent, Christmas and Jesus locate it within a Christian sphere. The depth of the reflections, combined with the disjointed narrative, gives readers a simultaneously vague and intimate sense of who the author is. There are perhaps too many mentions of highly specific details, however, such as people’s names and addresses, and the lack of context may make it difficult for readers to fully relate to these writings. However, Richane’s thoughtfulness, depth of feeling and attention to the world around her may inspire readers to slow down and bring similar mindfulness to their own lives.

A poetic, attentive and often rich collection.

Pub Date: May 20, 2014

ISBN: 978-1499023848

Page Count: 114

Publisher: Xlibris

Review Posted Online: Dec. 12, 2014

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Whether you call this a personal story or nature writing, it’s poignant, thoughtful and moving—and likely to become a...

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H IS FOR HAWK

An inspired, beautiful and absorbing account of a woman battling grief—with a goshawk.

Following the sudden death of her father, Macdonald (History and Philosophy/Cambridge Univ.; Falcon, 2006, etc.) tried staving off deep depression with a unique form of personal therapy: the purchase and training of an English goshawk, which she named Mabel. Although a trained falconer, the author chose a raptor both unfamiliar and unpredictable, a creature of mad confidence that became a means of working against madness. “The hawk was everything I wanted to be: solitary, self-possessed, free from grief, and numb to the hurts of human life,” she writes. As a devotee of birds of prey since girlhood, Macdonald knew the legends and the literature, particularly the cautionary example of The Once and Future King author T.H. White, whose 1951 book The Goshawk details his own painful battle to master his title subject. Macdonald dramatically parallels her own story with White’s, achieving a remarkable imaginative sympathy with the writer, a lonely, tormented homosexual fighting his own sadomasochistic demons. Even as she was learning from White’s mistakes, she found herself very much in his shoes, watching her life fall apart as the painfully slow bonding process with Mabel took over. Just how much do animals and humans have in common? The more Macdonald got to know her, the more Mabel confounded her notions about what the species was supposed to represent. Is a hawk a symbol of might or independence, or is that just our attempt to remake the animal world in our own image? Writing with breathless urgency that only rarely skirts the melodramatic, Macdonald broadens her scope well beyond herself to focus on the antagonism between people and the environment.

Whether you call this a personal story or nature writing, it’s poignant, thoughtful and moving—and likely to become a classic in either genre.

Pub Date: March 3, 2015

ISBN: 978-0802123411

Page Count: 288

Publisher: Grove

Review Posted Online: Nov. 4, 2014

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 15, 2014

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A very welcome instance of philosophy that can help readers live a good life.

THE ART OF SOLITUDE

A teacher and scholar of Buddhism offers a formally varied account of the available rewards of solitude.

“As Mother Ayahuasca takes me in her arms, I realize that last night I vomited up my attachment to Buddhism. In passing out, I died. In coming to, I was, so to speak, reborn. I no longer have to fight these battles, I repeat to myself. I am no longer a combatant in the dharma wars. It feels as if the course of my life has shifted onto another vector, like a train shunted off its familiar track onto a new trajectory.” Readers of Batchelor’s previous books (Secular Buddhism: Imagining the Dharma in an Uncertain World, 2017, etc.) will recognize in this passage the culmination of his decadeslong shift away from the religious commitments of Buddhism toward an ecumenical and homegrown philosophy of life. Writing in a variety of modes—memoir, history, collage, essay, biography, and meditation instruction—the author doesn’t argue for his approach to solitude as much as offer it for contemplation. Essentially, Batchelor implies that if you read what Buddha said here and what Montaigne said there, and if you consider something the author has noticed, and if you reflect on your own experience, you have the possibility to improve the quality of your life. For introspective readers, it’s easy to hear in this approach a direct response to Pascal’s claim that “all of humanity's problems stem from man's inability to sit quietly in a room alone.” Batchelor wants to relieve us of this inability by offering his example of how to do just that. “Solitude is an art. Mental training is needed to refine and stabilize it,” he writes. “When you practice solitude, you dedicate yourself to the care of the soul.” Whatever a soul is, the author goes a long way toward soothing it.

A very welcome instance of philosophy that can help readers live a good life.

Pub Date: Feb. 18, 2020

ISBN: 978-0-300-25093-0

Page Count: 200

Publisher: Yale Univ.

Review Posted Online: Nov. 25, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 15, 2019

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