THE RICH MAN AND THE PARROT

The Indian parrot that finds a way to escape from his comfortable, yet confining cage in a rich Persian merchant’s garden, exemplifies the desire for liberty. This 13th-century tale, retold from the Masnavi, a collection by the Persian poet Rumi, is set in a later period, denoted by the merchant’s touring car and turn-of-the-20th-century furnishings, but it remains timeless. When the merchant takes a buying trip to India, the bird asks him to visit his brother parrots. The man obeys and witnesses a strange turn of events. At the merchant’s greeting, the colorful birds all fall down, seemingly dead. When the merchant tells his beloved pet this story, the parrot imitates his brothers and the merchant is horrified. Only then does the man open the cage and the wily bird escapes, telling the man how his fellow parrots gave him insight into how to win his freedom. An easy-to-understand allegory with colorful paintings of both the beautiful yet domesticated Persian garden and the wilder Indian jungle. (biographical note about Rumi) (Picture book/folktale. 6-10)

Pub Date: April 1, 2007

ISBN: 978-0-8075-5059-5

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Whitman

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 15, 2007

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An engaging mix of gentle behavior modeling and inventive story ideas that may well provide just the push needed to get some...

RALPH TELLS A STORY

With a little help from his audience, a young storyteller gets over a solid case of writer’s block in this engaging debut.

Despite the (sometimes creatively spelled) examples produced by all his classmates and the teacher’s assertion that “Stories are everywhere!” Ralph can’t get past putting his name at the top of his paper. One day, lying under the desk in despair, he remembers finding an inchworm in the park. That’s all he has, though, until his classmates’ questions—“Did it feel squishy?” “Did your mom let you keep it?” “Did you name it?”—open the floodgates for a rousing yarn featuring an interloping toddler, a broad comic turn and a dramatic rescue. Hanlon illustrates the episode with childlike scenes done in transparent colors, featuring friendly-looking children with big smiles and widely spaced button eyes. The narrative text is printed in standard type, but the children’s dialogue is rendered in hand-lettered printing within speech balloons. The episode is enhanced with a page of elementary writing tips and the tantalizing titles of his many subsequent stories (“When I Ate Too Much Spaghetti,” “The Scariest Hamster,” “When the Librarian Yelled Really Loud at Me,” etc.) on the back endpapers.

An engaging mix of gentle behavior modeling and inventive story ideas that may well provide just the push needed to get some budding young writers off and running. (Picture book. 6-8)

Pub Date: Sept. 18, 2012

ISBN: 978-0761461807

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Amazon Children's Publishing

Review Posted Online: Aug. 22, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2012

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KEENA FORD AND THE SECOND-GRADE MIX-UP

Diarist Keena Ford is ambivalent about second grade: Girls and boys are placed in separate classes, so she will not be with her best friend, Eric. But she resolves to do her best and when Ms. Coleman turns up on the first day of school in a “COOL BELT WITH SPARKLES,” she decides things are looking up. When she mixes up her dates and leads her teacher to believe that the next day is her birthday, greed for chocolate cake overcomes honesty, plunging her into ever-deeper hot water. Morrison’s amiable illustrations clearly depict Keena as a lively African-American girl, but there is little in the text to lend her any ethnic or cultural specificity. The result is that she seems to be just another sassy, impulsive chapter-book heroine à la Clementine or Moxy Maxwell. Still, her escapades and the way she handles them ring with an emotional honesty readers will recognize: If she continues to develop, she has the potential to become a genuine character in her own right. (Fiction. 6-9)

Pub Date: July 1, 2008

ISBN: 978-0-8037-3263-6

Page Count: 112

Publisher: Dial Books

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2008

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