A heartfelt but narrow prescription for finding a partner and creating a loving heterosexual marriage.

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12 Seconds to Manifesting Your Blessings for Dates, Marriage and Finances

A Christianity-based approach to relationships driven by positive thinking, based on the authors’ own courtship and marriage.

In this debut self-help book, Palmer-Perera and Perera present a 12-step technique for self-improvement, particularly in the areas of dating and marriage, based on their Christian faith, with their own marriage serving as the primary example. The book follows the pattern set by The Secret and similar books, encouraging the reader to adopt a positive mindset and act accordingly, with the assurance that success will follow: “This universe is designed to serve you. By birth you are supposed to rule over this place, subdue it and take dominion over it so that you can live a life that is fruitful and delectable.” Each chapter introduces one of the authors’ “universal laws” followed by a case study and a series of Bible verses that provides answers to questions the authors pose. Most of the examples presented pertain to relationships, but others, like the story of a woman who won the lottery after she “wrote the number 112 million down on a piece of paper” and “gained confidence that she had already won the lottery,” demonstrate the broader applications (and limits) of the book’s philosophy. Interstitial sections lucidly and gradually develop Palmer-Perera’s and her husband’s stories of overcoming failed relationships and personal challenges to find happiness together, which may offer hope or guidance to readers facing similar situations. The guidelines here suggest a clear distinction between male and female roles and apply only in a heteronormative context: same-sex relationships are categorized as “breaking a universal law.” While the authors write with enthusiasm and a clear belief in the viability of their 12-second plan, their arguments are most likely to appeal to readers who share their interpretation of Christianity.

A heartfelt but narrow prescription for finding a partner and creating a loving heterosexual marriage.

Pub Date: Aug. 31, 2015

ISBN: 978-1-5085-5839-2

Page Count: 374

Publisher: CreateSpace

Review Posted Online: Oct. 2, 2015

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Doyle offers another lucid, inspiring chronicle of female empowerment and the rewards of self-awareness and renewal.

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UNTAMED

More life reflections from the bestselling author on themes of societal captivity and the catharsis of personal freedom.

In her third book, Doyle (Love Warrior, 2016, etc.) begins with a life-changing event. “Four years ago,” she writes, “married to the father of my three children, I fell in love with a woman.” That woman, Abby Wambach, would become her wife. Emblematically arranged into three sections—“Caged,” “Keys,” “Freedom”—the narrative offers, among other elements, vignettes about the soulful author’s girlhood, when she was bulimic and felt like a zoo animal, a “caged girl made for wide-open skies.” She followed the path that seemed right and appropriate based on her Catholic upbringing and adolescent conditioning. After a downward spiral into “drinking, drugging, and purging,” Doyle found sobriety and the authentic self she’d been suppressing. Still, there was trouble: Straining an already troubled marriage was her husband’s infidelity, which eventually led to life-altering choices and the discovery of a love she’d never experienced before. Throughout the book, Doyle remains open and candid, whether she’s admitting to rigging a high school homecoming court election or denouncing the doting perfectionism of “cream cheese parenting,” which is about “giving your children the best of everything.” The author’s fears and concerns are often mirrored by real-world issues: gender roles and bias, white privilege, racism, and religion-fueled homophobia and hypocrisy. Some stories merely skim the surface of larger issues, but Doyle revisits them in later sections and digs deeper, using friends and familial references to personify their impact on her life, both past and present. Shorter pieces, some only a page in length, manage to effectively translate an emotional gut punch, as when Doyle’s therapist called her blooming extramarital lesbian love a “dangerous distraction.” Ultimately, the narrative is an in-depth look at a courageous woman eager to share the wealth of her experiences by embracing vulnerability and reclaiming her inner strength and resiliency.

Doyle offers another lucid, inspiring chronicle of female empowerment and the rewards of self-awareness and renewal.

Pub Date: March 10, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-9848-0125-8

Page Count: 352

Publisher: Dial

Review Posted Online: Dec. 22, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 15, 2020

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The book would have benefited from a tighter structure, but it’s inspiring and relatable for readers with depression.

THE HILARIOUS WORLD OF DEPRESSION

The creator and host of the titular podcast recounts his lifelong struggles with depression.

With the increasing success of his podcast, Moe, a longtime radio personality and author whose books include The Deleted E-Mails of Hillary Clinton: A Parody (2015), was encouraged to open up further about his own battles with depression and delve deeper into characteristics of the disease itself. Moe writes about how he has struggled with depression throughout his life, and he recounts similar experiences from the various people he has interviewed in the past, many of whom are high-profile entertainers and writers—e.g. Dick Cavett and Andy Richter, novelist John Green. The narrative unfolds in a fairly linear fashion, and the author relates his family’s long history with depression and substance abuse. His father was an alcoholic, and one of his brothers was a drug addict. Moe tracks how he came to recognize his own signs of depression while in middle school, as he experienced the travails of OCD and social anxiety. These early chapters alternate with brief thematic “According to THWoD” sections that expand on his experiences, providing relevant anecdotal stories from some of his podcast guests. In this early section of the book, the author sometimes rambles. Though his experiences as an adolescent are accessible, he provides too many long examples, overstating his message, and some of the humor feels forced. What may sound naturally breezy in his podcast interviews doesn’t always strike the same note on the written page. The narrative gains considerable momentum when Moe shifts into his adult years and the challenges of balancing family and career while also confronting the devastating loss of his brother from suicide. As he grieved, he writes, his depression caused him to experience “a salad of regret, anger, confusion, and horror.” Here, the author focuses more attention on the origins and evolution of his series, stories that prove compelling as well.

The book would have benefited from a tighter structure, but it’s inspiring and relatable for readers with depression.

Pub Date: May 5, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-250-20928-3

Page Count: 304

Publisher: St. Martin's

Review Posted Online: Feb. 5, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 2020

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