THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK by Ted Trueblood

THE HUNTER'S HANDBOOK

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A personal narrative tells an abundance of the kinds of anecdotes any gun fan would love to exchange with another of his like and provides a fund of information that is well ordered, considering the style. Roughly divided into three sections-shotgun hunting, rifle bunting and how to cook what you've killed, the stories recount Mr. Trueblood's own experience with Mrs. T. and friends. They range regionally from Idaho to New England, deal with the wiles and weaknesses of the ruffed grouse and sage hen, the goat and the white tailed deer, how to make an adequate camp and to broil that succulent elk steak. And the guns and dogs and local regulations are not forgotten, for in reading along with Mr. Trueblood, which huntsmen will do with pleasure, there are a lot of facts about them too. The target is set for the sport.

Pub Date: Feb. 1st, 1953
Publisher: Crowell