Teen Book Reviews (page 2)

PRISONER OF NIGHT AND FOG by Anne Blankman
Released: April 22, 2014

"An interesting perspective on a well-trod era. (author's note, bibliography) (Historical fiction. 13-17)"
In 1930s Munich, a young German girl learns to question her learned hatred for Jewish people.   Read full book review >
EXPIRATION DAY by William Campbell Powell
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: April 22, 2014

"An auspicious debut. (Science fiction. 13 & up)"
In this coming-of-age diary, a girl navigates life in a dystopic near-future. Read full book review >

THE BOUNDLESS by Kenneth Oppel
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 22, 2014

"Canadian railway history, fantasy, a flutter of romance—and a thoughtful examination of social injustice—collide in this entertaining swashbuckler from the author of Printz Honor-winning Airborn (2005). (Historical fantasy. 9-14)"
William Everett is proud of his rags-to-riches father, manager of the Canadian Pacific Railway, but he wants to forge his own destiny. Read full book review >
MERIDIAN by Josin L. McQuein
Released: April 22, 2014

"Worldbuilding and characterization are the highlights of this inventive post-apocalyptic adventure. (Science fiction. 12-18)"
This sequel to Arclight (2013) continues the apocalyptic story of a colony that has survived an invasion of nanites that absorbed most of the human race. Read full book review >
OPEN ROAD SUMMER by Emery Lord
Released: April 19, 2014

"Lord successfully adapts classic elements of adult romance novels into a love story gentle enough for younger readers. (Romance. 12-18)"
Reagan joins her best friend Delilah's summer concert tour to escape some poor decisions and break some bad habits, finding romance and complication instead. Read full book review >

LOST IN THOUGHT by Cara Bertrand
Released: April 18, 2014

"For genre fans only. (Paranormal romance. 12-18)"
This debut sends a paranormally afflicted teen to a posh school with a secret in this familiar-feeling series opener. Read full book review >
BIG FAT DISASTER by Beth Fehlbaum
Released: April 18, 2014

"Colby's experiences, while extreme, ring true, and the fast pace, lively and profane dialogue, and timely topic make it a quick and enjoyable read. (Fiction. 12-16)"
Colby's life as the heavy daughter of a disapproving former Miss Texas beauty queen is difficult enough, but it gets worse very quickly once she discovers a photo of her politician father kissing another woman. Read full book review >
BUGGED by Sarah Albee
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 15, 2014

"Tailor-made for epidemiologists-in-the-making and connoisseurs of the gross. (glossary, multimedia information sources, index) (Nonfiction. 11-14)"
From the creators of Poop Happened! (2010), a swarm of bug-driven disasters suffered through the centuries. Read full book review >
HOPE IS A GIRL SELLING FRUIT by Amrita Das
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 15, 2014

""We're all in this together," Das writes, "lost, but not quite." Older, Western children and teens may well feel they've found an unexpected comrade. (afterword on the art) (Picture book. 11-16)"
Das debuts with illustrations done in a distinctive Indian style paired to a brief meditative text—part memoir, part artist's statement, part rumination—on women's personal journeys. Read full book review >
PROFESSOR WHISKERTON PRESENTS STEAMPUNK ABC by Lisa Falkenstern
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: April 15, 2014

"Though just a context-void bagatelle for actual children, perhaps teen and adult steampunk enthusiasts will take a look. (Picture book. 12 & up)"
Here's another ABC book that takes an unusual theme and manipulates the device for a very sophisticated audience. Read full book review >
WHAT I THOUGHT WAS TRUE by Huntley Fitzpatrick
ROMANCE
Released: April 15, 2014

"Much deeper than the pretty cover lets on. (Fiction. 14 & up)"
 A teenage girl struggles with class divisions, sex and the tricky art of communication. Read full book review >
YOU ONLY LIVE ONCE by Bridie Clark
Released: April 15, 2014

"This format, which rarely devotes more than a few pages to any particular character or topic, results in a novel that skims, rather than explores, the pressures many high school students face daily. (Fiction. 14-18)"
Told with second-person narration, Clark's sequel to Maybe Tonight? (2013) returns "you" to your elite boarding school for your sophomore year of high school, as before ending chapters with Choose Your Own Adventure-style scenarios. Read full book review >