Teen Book Reviews (page 3)

MIRAGE by Tracy Clark
Released: July 5, 2016

"A psychological thriller that's not. (Thriller. 14-18)"
Ryan is a 17-year-old adrenaline junkie who thrives on the fear others usually wither beneath and who spends her summer days jumping from planes at her parents' sky-diving center in the Mojave Desert. Read full book review >
THE DRAWING LESSON by Mark Crilley
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: July 5, 2016

"An original and accessible way to learn to draw. (Graphic nonfiction. 10-14)"
This 144-page book delivers exactly what it promises: a graphic novel that teaches readers to draw. Read full book review >

THE EXORCISM OF SOFIA FLORES by Danielle Vega
Released: July 5, 2016

"A departure from the Mean Girls aesthetic of the first book but a sequel still meant for only the most unflinching of readers. (Horror. 14 & up)"
Sofia Flores returns, this time to save her own soul, as a relentless demon, Catholic dogma, and a sinfully attractive classmate threaten to tear her apart in Vega's gruesome sequel to Merciless (2014). Read full book review >
LEARNING TO SWEAR IN AMERICA by Katie Kennedy
Released: July 5, 2016

"An end-of-the-world romp that will prompt readers to think and to laugh, this novel ultimately teases more suspense and romance than it genuinely delivers. (Fiction. 14-18)"
The fate of the world rests on the shoulders of an awkward teenage genius in Kennedy's comical debut novel. Read full book review >
FEATHERS by Rose Mannering
Released: July 5, 2016

"Here's hoping the last installment isn't such a quagmire of negative tropes and stereotypes. Disappointing. (Fantasy. 12-18)"
A gender-bent Swan Lake retelling and sequel to Roses (2013). Read full book review >

THE SIEGE by Mark Alpert
Released: July 5, 2016

"Worth reading for its unanswered questions if not for its heart. (Science fiction. 13-16)"
Adam and the other sentient, robot Pioneers return to battle evil Sigma, who targets Adam's hometown and everyone he loves by pitting the Pioneers against one another. Read full book review >
DEFENDING TAYLOR by Miranda Kenneally
Released: July 5, 2016

"Read it for Taylor's journey but not for anything deeper. (Fiction. 12-18)"
When a Tennessee senator's daughter is expelled from her posh prep school, she faces challenges at her new, public high school. Read full book review >
FAITH by Jody Houser
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: July 5, 2016

"You go, girl. (Graphic fantasy. 12 & up)"
Fat and fierce superhero Zephyr—aka Faith Herbert—leaves the Harbinger Resistance to fly solo. Read full book review >
Life After Juliet by Shannon Lee Alexander
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: July 5, 2016

"A successful story of a young woman's journey through grief."
In this YA coming-of-age novel, a teenage girl who's lost her best friend must learn how to open her heart again. Read full book review >
THE INSIDE OF OUT by Jenn Marie Thorne
Released: July 1, 2016

"A light read that overreaches in its attempts to tackle weighty issues of privilege and privacy. (Fiction. 12-18)"
Good intentions have unintended consequences in this tale of a misguided LGBTQ ally. Read full book review >
NEVER MISSING, NEVER FOUND by Amanda Panitch
Released: June 28, 2016

"A few unexpected twists and turns hold the contrivance all together for a pleasurably disturbing climax. (Thriller. 12-16)"
An abduction survivor encounters a girl who reminds her eerily of her five years as a prisoner. Read full book review >
RUN by Kody Keplinger
Released: June 28, 2016

"An ambitiously structured road-trip novel stumbles a bit but gets a lot right. (Fiction. 14-18)"
Two small-town Kentucky high school girls run away together. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >