Teen Book Reviews (page 3)

BEAUTIFUL BROKEN GIRLS by Kim Savage
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"Haunting and mesmerizing. (Fiction. 14 & up)"
After two sisters commit suicide, the boy next door traces the notes one left behind for him. Read full book review >
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"Thoughtful and brimming with justified teen angst, Kearney's fast-paced tale offers illuminating insights into the perils and rewards of self-discovery. (Verse fiction. 12-18)"
A college-age adoptee searches for her birth mother. Read full book review >

DOMINION by Shane Arbuthnott
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"Though some of the physics may leave some readers dizzy, feisty young Molly will keep them grounded in this page-turning mystical adventure. (Steampunk. 10-14)"
A steampunk adventure forces its young protagonist to choose which side she's on. Read full book review >
HOW NOT TO DISAPPEAR by Clare Furniss
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"Gorgeous, compelling, and painful, though subtle as a brick—or a baby. (Fiction. 14-17)"
A long-lost great-aunt, a positive pregnancy test, and a road trip across England. Read full book review >
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Feb. 17, 2017

"This adaptation will diminish Red Cloud's legacy, perpetuate negative stereotypes, and provide incorrect information to young readers: skip. (afterword, acknowledgments, timeline, glossary, historical sites, further information, index) (Nonfiction. 10-16)"
In 1868, Red Cloud, a respected Oglala chief, led an intertribal war against the U.S. Army and won. Read full book review >

WHEN MORNING COMES by Arushi Raina
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 15, 2017

"This timely reminder of the power and passion of young people contextualizes current student protests by honoring those of the past. (historical note, glossary, glossary sources) (Historical fiction. 13 & up)"
In her debut novel, Raina applies the now-familiar "teenage girl takes on the government" trope to the Soweto uprising of June 1976. Read full book review >
ANOTHER CASTLE by Andrew Wheeler
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Feb. 15, 2017

"Quirky, unconventional, and a lot of fun. (Graphic fantasy. 12 & up)"
A royal damsel, finding herself in distress, decides to save the day—and not one, but two kingdoms. Read full book review >
THE LAST OF AUGUST by Brittany Cavallaro
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"This muddled mystery rests on elaborate machinations with disproportionate motivations, but the emotional odyssey should satisfy readers seeking a contemporary, teenage take on the Baker Street pair. (Mystery. 14 & up)"
A duo becomes a trio and tries to settle family feuds in this relationship-focused crime caper sequel to A Study in Charlotte (2016). Read full book review >
DARE YOU by Jennifer Brown
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"It's good that Nikki's developed some self-control, as it will help motivate readers to stick around for Volume 3 and the continuation of the mystery. (Suspense. 12-18)"
In this sequel to Shade Me (2016), synesthete Nikki Kill continues her search for the murderer of Peyton Hollis and for answers that can explain her own past. Read full book review >
REVENGE OF THE EVIL LIBRARIAN by Michelle Knudsen
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"Campy, from the setting to the humor to the horror, and all the better for it. (Humorous horror. 13 & up)"
Take one part humor, add an equal part horror, and spice with teenage drama (musical and romantical) for a (slightly grim) laugh. Read full book review >
THE WISH GRANTER by C.J. Redwine
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"Satisfying fare for fantasy fans. (Fantasy. 12-18)"
In a companion book to The Shadow Queen (2016), Ari becomes a reluctant princess when her brother makes a disastrous deal with the notorious Wish Granter. Read full book review >
FINDING JADE by Mary Jennifer Payne
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"With repetitive language, underdeveloped storyline, and lackluster worldbuilding, this series opener leaves much to be desired. (Paranormal adventure. 12-16)"
A Canadian teen discovers paranormal powers in the near future. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Yoojin Grace Wuertz
February 27, 2017

In Yoojin Grace Wuertz’s debut novel Everything Belongs to Us, the setting is Seoul in 1978. At South Korea’s top university, the nation’s best and brightest compete to join the professional elite of an authoritarian regime. Success could lead to a life of rarefied privilege and wealth; failure means being left irrevocably behind. For childhood friends Jisun and Namin, the stakes couldn’t be more different. Jisun, the daughter of a powerful business mogul, grew up on a mountainside estate with lush gardens and a dedicated chauffeur. Namin’s parents run a tented food cart from dawn to curfew; her sister works in a shoe factory. Now Jisun wants as little to do with her father’s world as possible, abandoning her schoolwork in favor of the underground activist movement, while Namin studies tirelessly in the service of one goal: to launch herself and her family out of poverty. But everything changes when Jisun and Namin meet an ambitious, charming student named Sunam, whose need to please his family has led him to a prestigious club: the Circle. Under the influence of his mentor, Juno, a manipulative social climber, Sunam becomes entangled with both women, as they all make choices that will change their lives forever. “Engrossing,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “Wuertz is an important new voice in American fiction.” View video >