Teen Book Reviews (page 4)

THE FORGETTING by Sharon Cameron
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"A well-crafted fable for our time: as we focus on filling the plate in front of us, we risk forgetting where it came from, what it cost, and what that means. (Science fiction.12-16)"
Every 12 years, the people of Canaan lose their memories and must reconstitute identity and relationships from books recording their personal histories—but with her memory secretly intact, Nadia dreads the chaos and violence the imminent Forgetting will bring. Read full book review >
THE ISLAND by Olivia Levez
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"Not all readers will embrace this novel's haunting, open-ended conclusion, but those who do will find much to appreciate and discuss. (Adventure. 13-16)"
A teen struggles against both nature and her own past experiences in a reflective survival tale. Read full book review >

ABC by Benedikt Gross
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"This alphabet scavenger hunt will intrigue adults perhaps more than kids, but it's fascinating and extremely inventive. (Picture book. 5 & up)"
This alphabet book takes the ABCs to new heights—literally. Read full book review >
ALUTA by Adwoa Badoe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"As revolutions go, this is a rather dull one. (Historical fiction. 14 & up)"
As author and storyteller Badoe chronicles 18-year-old first-year political science student Charlotte Adom's college life at the University of Science and Technology in Kumasi, Ghana, it's one of studying hard, eating home-cooked meals between classes—and dating. Read full book review >
ANOTHER ME by Eva Wiseman
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"Readers will need the Kleenex for this one. (author's note, glossary) (Historical fiction. 12-16)"
The bubonic plague brings added misery and death to European Jews. Read full book review >

WHEN THEY FADE by Jeyn Roberts
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"A satisfying read that tackles heavy issues and is never weighed down by them. (Paranormal suspense. 14-18)"
Canadian author Roberts delivers a modern ghost story. Read full book review >
THE BOMBS THAT BROUGHT US TOGETHER by Brian Conaghan
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"Charlie's cleareyed account delivers a powerful anti-war statement without a hint of pedantry.(Fiction. 10-14)"
All things considered, Charlie had been having a pretty good summer. Read full book review >
FREEDOM'S JUST ANOTHER WORD by Caroline Stellings
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"Time spent with this strong, savvy female protagonist is time well spent, so long as readers focus on that journey. (Historical fiction. 14-18)"
Sometimes the journey is just as important as the destination. Read full book review >
SNOW WHITE by Matt Phelan
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"Brilliant. (Graphic adaptation. 9 & up)"
Imagined through a 1920s lens, "Snow White" unfolds as a graphic novel. Read full book review >
THE BOY WHO KILLED GRANT PARKER by Kat Spears
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"A big disappointment for fans of Spears' other work; for a stellar exploration of the rural South, read Jeff Zentner's The Serpent King (2016) instead. (Fiction. 14-18)"
One teen replaces another at the top of a small-town social pyramid. Read full book review >
TRAILBLAZERS by Rachel Swaby
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"An interesting, engaging collection of snapshot profiles that will encourage readers to explore further and perhaps pursue their own scientific curiosities. (source notes, bibliography) (Collective biography. 10-14)"
With STEM now the hot trend in education and concerted efforts to encourage girls to explore scientific fields, this collective biography is most timely. Read full book review >
GAMESCAPE by Emma Trevayne
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"An overlong but reasonably effective dystopian thriller. (Science fiction. 14-17)"
A teen gamer plays for his life. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jeff Chang
September 20, 2016

In the provocative essays in journalist Jeff Chang’s new book We Gon’ Be Alright, Chang takes an incisive and wide-ranging look at the recent tragedies and widespread protests that have shaken the country. Through deep reporting with key activists and thinkers, personal writing, and cultural criticism, We Gon’ Be Alright links #BlackLivesMatter to #OscarsSoWhite, Ferguson to Washington D.C., the Great Migration to resurgent nativism. Chang explores the rise and fall of the idea of “diversity,” the roots of student protest, changing ideas about Asian Americanness, and the impact of a century of racial separation in housing. “He implores readers to listen, act, and become involved with today’s activists, who offer ‘new ways to see our past and our present,’ ” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations.” View video >