Teen Book Reviews (page 543)

BREATHE by Penni Russon
FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 2007

"Richly told, the whole has delicate shadings of language, of the complicated relationships between siblings, between divorced parents and among folk one might meet on the Internet. (Fantasy. YA)"
The first in this series, Undine (2005), a lovely if unresolved tale of adolescence and magic set in Tasmania, is carried forward—but still not resolved—in this sequel. Read full book review >
BROKEN MOON by Kim Antieau
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 2007

"A well-intentioned but flawed execution of a fascinating story. (Fiction. 12-14)"
Six years after she was scarred in a brutal attack—sanctioned by the elders of her Pakistani village as punishment in an interfamily dispute—Nadira, 18, labors as a domestic servant in Karachi, supporting her widowed mother and little brother, Umar. Read full book review >

BEING by Kevin Brooks
ADVENTURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2007

"However, it's more likely that once the opening premise fades, teens will give up on this title. (Fiction. YA)"
During a routine exam, 16-year-old Robert Smith feels the scalpel's slice and helplessly views metal and plastic parts inside his stomach wall. Read full book review >
SILENT ECHOES by Carla Jablonski
FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 2007

"But the plot moves along quickly and will likely grab the attention of young teens. (Fantasy. 12-15)"
Jablonski is in familiar territory in this pseudo time-travel/feminist treatise. Read full book review >
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Feb. 1, 2007

This upbeat, bifurcated third installment of the Geography Club saga follows the narratives of not one but two queer characters: gay-straight alliance chums Russel Middlebrook and his best friend Min. Read full book review >

TAMAR by Mal Peet
FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 2007

"Simply superb. (notes, acknowledgments) (Fiction. YA)"
In 1944, Dart and Tamar, code names for two undercover operatives for Britain's Special Operations Executive, parachute into Holland to reorganize the Dutch resistance movement. Read full book review >
RECKONING by Kate Cary
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Feb. 1, 2007

"The premise—a heroine torn between love of a good man and the seductive power of a redeemable vampire—will appeal to readers of that genre, and close ties to Dracula and epistolatory style add some originality. (Fantasy. 12-14)"
This vampiric love story, told in diary entries, continues the tale of Dracula's descendents begun in Bloodline (2005). Read full book review >
CUPCAKE by Rachel Cohn
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Jan. 23, 2007

"Fun fluff, about as satisfying as most cupcakes. (Fiction. YA)"
Now 18, Cyd Charisse is back in New York, living with half-brother Danny and missing her ex-boyfriend Shrimp. Read full book review >
IMPULSE by Ellen Hopkins
FICTION
Released: Jan. 23, 2007

"A fast, jagged, hypnotic read. (Fiction. YA)"
In sharp, searing free verse divided into two-page chapters, Hopkins sketches three adolescents who have just attempted suicide. Read full book review >
TATTOO by Jennifer Lynn Barnes
FANTASY
Released: Jan. 9, 2007

"Fantastical, but with a reality check. (Fiction. YA)"
Just like any other Friday night, close friends Bailey, Delia, Zo and Annabelle are hanging out at the mall, but when the girls apply temporary tattoos of strange symbols, the evening quickly becomes anything but ordinary. Read full book review >
ANATOMY OF A BOYFRIEND by Daria Snadowsky
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Jan. 9, 2007

"Highly reminiscent of Blume's Forever without quite attaining the same depth, but successful nonetheless. (Fiction. YA)"
In this sexually explicit exploration of first love in the tradition of Judy Blume—to whom this is dedicated—17-year-old Dominique falls hard for handsome track star Wes, a shy boy who clearly likes her but makes no romantic moves. Read full book review >
BETTER THAN YESTERDAY by Robyn Schneider
FICTION
Released: Jan. 9, 2007

"Young readers should find it entertaining and satisfying. (Fiction. YA)"
Two prep-school friends cope with changes and difficulties as they attend summer session before their senior year. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >