Teen Book Reviews (page 543)

FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2008

"Debut author Goldman, who clearly understands how teen boys think and speak, delivers an understated, genuine delight. (Fiction. 12-16)"
Take one nudity- and violence-filled claymation film, a suddenly gay best friend and plenty of dry wit. Read full book review >
THE KNIFE OF NEVER LETTING GO by Patrick Ness
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2008

"Attempting to address adolescent angst, information overload and war, Ness ends up delivering merely noise. (Science fiction. YA)"
Todd Hewitt has never known quiet. Read full book review >

ALICIA AFTERIMAGE by Lulu Delacre
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 2008

"This lovely tribute to Alicia's memory is neither thought-provoking nor especially interesting for the general reader. (Nonfiction. 12 & up)"
After Alicia Betancourt died in a car accident in 2004, her mother, picture-book illustrator Delacre, put together this collection of thoughts and memories of Alicia from her friends and family. Read full book review >
THE SHEPHERD’S GRANDDAUGHTER by Anne Laurel Carter
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2008

"Thoughtful and engaging. (Fiction. YA)"
Information-packed but never didactic, this moving narrative describes the life of a Palestinian girl. Read full book review >
THIS BOOK ISN’T FAT, IT’S FABULOUS by Nina Beck
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2008

"8230;in eating disorders'), this girl has flair. (Fiction. YA)"
From a wealthy, snarky social scene to a fat camp resembling "a foreign country filled with geeks," 16-year-old Riley's narration is hilarious and fresh. Read full book review >

PEMBA’S SONG by Marilyn Nelson
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 2008

"However, there is a persistent rushing of the narrative, with details emerging unnaturally fast, that detracts from the overall appeal of this novella. (Fiction. 12 & up)"
A beautifully written, richly historical but too-quickly paced tale unfolds in two voices in this suspenseful ghost story. Read full book review >
MY FATHER’S SON by Terri Fields
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 2008

"Although the surprising conclusion seems a little contrived after the believable realism of the rest of the tale, this is still a fast-paced and sometimes disturbing look at families and violent crime and its many victims, seen and unseen. (Fiction. 12 & up)"
High-school junior Kevin Windor leads the most normal of lives, until the day his father is arrested for a particularly brutal series of murders. Read full book review >
FANTASY
Released: Aug. 26, 2008

"Maggie's snarky humor and quirky personality keeps this novel's first half light, but the second takes a dark, page-turning twist as Maggie is forced to figure out and destroy the ancient source of the sisters' power. (Horror. YA)"
Supernaturally perceptive teen Maggie Quinn battles evil again in this sequel (Prom Dates from Hell, 2007), which fast forwards to her first semester at Bedivere University (BU), where, to Maggie's surprise, she finds herself rushing campus sororities. Read full book review >
THE REMINDER by Rune Michaels
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Aug. 26, 2008

"Unrewarding, even for those looking for a fast read. (Science fiction. 12 & up)"
Neither Daisy nor her father can leave dead well enough alone. Read full book review >
CYCLER by Lauren McLaughlin
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Aug. 26, 2008

"Jill and Jack's story, touched with intrigue, humor and fascinating questions, ends with a conclusion both satisfactory and open-ended. (Fantasy. 14-16)"
Jill has truly terrible PMS: Every month, for four days, she turns into a boy. Read full book review >
IDENTICAL by Ellen Hopkins
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Aug. 26, 2008

"Sharp and stunning, with a brilliant final page. (Fiction. YA)"
Hopkins's gift with free verse reaches new heights in this portrait of splintered identical twins. Read full book review >
SWORD by Da Chen
ADVENTURE
Released: Aug. 26, 2008

"Fans of Asian martial-arts movies and manga will be satisfied and eager for the second volume, due in the fall. (Fantasy. 12-16)"
In the China of the Cultural Revolution, Ar Kin returns to his village after years spent in prison for speaking out against Communism, bringing with him a library of forbidden books and a head full of forbidden tales. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Clinton Kelly
January 9, 2017

Bestselling author and television host Clinton Kelly’s memoir I Hate Everyone Except You is a candid, deliciously snarky collection of essays about his journey from awkward kid to slightly-less-awkward adult. Clinton Kelly is probably best known for teaching women how to make their butts look smaller. But in I Hate Everyone, Except You, he reveals some heretofore-unknown secrets about himself, like that he’s a finicky connoisseur of 1980s pornography, a disillusioned critic of New Jersey’s premier water parks, and perhaps the world’s least enthused high-school commencement speaker. Whether he’s throwing his baby sister in the air to jumpstart her cheerleading career or heroically rescuing his best friend from death by mud bath, Clinton leaps life’s social hurdles with aplomb. With his signature wit, he shares his unique ability to navigate the stickiest of situations, like deciding whether it’s acceptable to eat chicken wings with a fork on live television (spoiler: it’s not). “A thoroughly light and entertaining memoir,” our critic writes. View video >