BUT WHAT ABOUT THE PEOPLE? by Terry Sanford

BUT WHAT ABOUT THE PEOPLE?

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A torrent of criticism has been poured upon the subject of public education recently, but little or none of it, despite its general usefulness, has ""squarely faced the fact that better public schools cost money,"" as James B. Conant points out in his foreword. Here lies Terry Sanford's most valuable contribution: when running for governor of North Carolina in 1960, he not only made radical improvement of educational facilities the central issue of his campaign, but he was not afraid to admit that all he intended to do would necessitate considerable tax increases. Whether or not one agrees that he chose the best sources of enlarged revenue (his first step was to extend the state sales tax to basics like food) no one can deny that he and his devoted, imaginative assistants accomplished wonders in the four short years of his term of office. There is much to learn from his account of how he obtained the money and personnel his plans required. Poverty, prejudice, automation, depletion of natural resources are seen as interlocking problems, that reinforce each other. As Sanford says, we must ""pick a starting place, any starting place."" Education in the all-inclusive sense he intends is the most logical place of all. Thus his book speaks not only to educators, parents and politicians, but to everyone who takes his role as citizen seriously.

Pub Date: Feb. 16th, 1965
Publisher: Harper & Row