Encouraging, clear tips on transforming one’s dialogue and demeanor.

Better Relationships Happier Lives

12 KEYS TO GETTING THERE

A professional communication instructor outlines a dozen strategies to improve interactions with others in this debut relationship guide.

In this primer, Turner details 12 communication tactics that she says readers may use to forge better relationship dynamics. They include paying closer attention (the author provides an exercise that shows how little one can recall regarding one’s own timepiece), avoiding “push/push back” (if you conversationally attack another person, Turner says, that person will naturally counterattack), and reducing sentences that use the word “but.” She also encourages abandoning one’s assumptions, embracing empathy, and realizing how one chooses one’s thoughts (“It’s not the person or event that causes our feelings. It’s what we think about it”). The book also recommends eliminating “can’t,” “would,” and “should” from one’s vocabulary as much as possible, paraphrasing and naming one’s emotions, and always striving for tact. Finally, she maps out a seven-step problem-solving process, including advice such as “aim for collaboration, not compromise,” and suggests eliminating “crabs,” or negative people, from one’s life. Overall, Turner offers tangible help regarding often simple but crucial ways to talk and listen. Although some of her chapters cover similar ground—tact and empathy, for instance, are closely aligned principles—she also offers an engaging array of down-to-earth examples and exercises to showcase how one can mindfully address and assess even silly attitudes (such as the idea that Thanksgiving must be celebrated in a particular way, for example). She also conveys her advice in a warm, relatable voice while also noting her own struggles with communication. Overall, it’s an excellent, engaging toolkit.

Encouraging, clear tips on transforming one’s dialogue and demeanor.

Pub Date: Oct. 19, 2015

ISBN: 978-1-5043-4126-4

Page Count: 136

Publisher: BalboaPress

Review Posted Online: Sept. 14, 2016

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Doyle offers another lucid, inspiring chronicle of female empowerment and the rewards of self-awareness and renewal.

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UNTAMED

More life reflections from the bestselling author on themes of societal captivity and the catharsis of personal freedom.

In her third book, Doyle (Love Warrior, 2016, etc.) begins with a life-changing event. “Four years ago,” she writes, “married to the father of my three children, I fell in love with a woman.” That woman, Abby Wambach, would become her wife. Emblematically arranged into three sections—“Caged,” “Keys,” “Freedom”—the narrative offers, among other elements, vignettes about the soulful author’s girlhood, when she was bulimic and felt like a zoo animal, a “caged girl made for wide-open skies.” She followed the path that seemed right and appropriate based on her Catholic upbringing and adolescent conditioning. After a downward spiral into “drinking, drugging, and purging,” Doyle found sobriety and the authentic self she’d been suppressing. Still, there was trouble: Straining an already troubled marriage was her husband’s infidelity, which eventually led to life-altering choices and the discovery of a love she’d never experienced before. Throughout the book, Doyle remains open and candid, whether she’s admitting to rigging a high school homecoming court election or denouncing the doting perfectionism of “cream cheese parenting,” which is about “giving your children the best of everything.” The author’s fears and concerns are often mirrored by real-world issues: gender roles and bias, white privilege, racism, and religion-fueled homophobia and hypocrisy. Some stories merely skim the surface of larger issues, but Doyle revisits them in later sections and digs deeper, using friends and familial references to personify their impact on her life, both past and present. Shorter pieces, some only a page in length, manage to effectively translate an emotional gut punch, as when Doyle’s therapist called her blooming extramarital lesbian love a “dangerous distraction.” Ultimately, the narrative is an in-depth look at a courageous woman eager to share the wealth of her experiences by embracing vulnerability and reclaiming her inner strength and resiliency.

Doyle offers another lucid, inspiring chronicle of female empowerment and the rewards of self-awareness and renewal.

Pub Date: March 10, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-9848-0125-8

Page Count: 352

Publisher: Dial Books

Review Posted Online: Dec. 22, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 15, 2020

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AN INVISIBLE THREAD

THE TRUE STORY OF AN 11-YEAR-OLD PANHANDLER, A BUSY SALES EXECUTIVE, AND AN UNLIKELY MEETING WITH DESTINY

A straightforward tale of kindness and paying it forward in 1980s New York.

When advertising executive Schroff answered a child’s request for spare change by inviting him for lunch, she did not expect the encounter to grow into a friendship that would endure into his adulthood. The author recounts how she and Maurice, a promising boy from a drug-addicted family, learned to trust each other. Schroff acknowledges risks—including the possibility of her actions being misconstrued and the tension of crossing socio-economic divides—but does not dwell on the complexities of homelessness or the philosophical problems of altruism. She does not question whether public recognition is beneficial, or whether it is sufficient for the recipient to realize the extent of what has been done. With the assistance of People human-interest writer Tresniowski (Tiger Virtues, 2005, etc.), Schroff adheres to a personal narrative that traces her troubled relationship with her father, her meetings with Maurice and his background, all while avoiding direct parallels, noting that their childhoods differed in severity even if they shared similar emotional voids. With feel-good dramatizations, the story seldom transcends the message that reaching out makes a difference. It is framed in simple terms, from attributing the first meeting to “two people with complicated pasts and fragile dreams” that were “somehow meant to be friends” to the conclusion that love is a driving force. Admirably, Schroff notes that she did not seek a role as a “substitute parent,” and she does not judge Maurice’s mother for her lifestyle. That both main figures experience a few setbacks yet eventually survive is never in question; the story fittingly concludes with an epilogue by Maurice. For readers seeking an uplifting reminder that small gestures matter.

 

Pub Date: Nov. 1, 2011

ISBN: 978-1-4516-4251-3

Page Count: 288

Publisher: Howard Books/Simon & Schuster

Review Posted Online: July 26, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2011

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