THE NEW GERMANY AND THE OLD NAZIS by T.H. Tetens

THE NEW GERMANY AND THE OLD NAZIS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

With all eyes focussed on the Berlin crisis, the question whether Naziism is dead, or still very much alive, may seem a secondary issue or the lesser of two evils. This book is an extensive examination of Germany today to prove that the ""Nazis have had a quiet comeback"" based not only on individual incidents (hate mongering, etc., which show an undiminished intolerance) and on the restoration to power of those who were leading members of the Hitler regime (i.e. the retention of Globe, who framed Hitler's racial laws; of many of Hitler's advisers who now serve as Cabinet members and Ministers under Adenauer). According to Tetens, Adenauer is dependent on the Nazis for support; the war criminals released have had a hero's welcome homesome ""20,000 unreconstructed criminals""; the reparations made have been reluctant, indemnification has been avoided when possible, and anti-Semitism is still part of the Weltanshauung with 68% of the country either actively or conditionally anti-Semitic. The new generation has been spared any knowledge of the sins of the fathers; Adenauer's image (projected by a public relations campaign) as a ""staunch democratic leader"" is altogether false, and Germany is an anything but dependable ally. As before, Germany will play a shrewd game of Realpolitik in which expedience, and self-interest, will be the governing principles. It is, all in all, an aroused, seemingly informed, extreme- one can hope- view of inside Germany which will depend on the months to come for its substantiation. Still it is less of a study in depth than Brian Connell's A Watcher on the Rhine.

Pub Date: Oct. 25th, 1961
Publisher: Random House