THE SEVENTH COMMANDMENT by T.H. Tracy

THE SEVENTH COMMANDMENT

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Thirteen cases of adultery, true but not famous, which ended in divorce actions have been selected from the past to the near present, and have various mises-en-scene, from England to America, from a darkened country kitchen to Mrs. Vanderbilt's Fancy Dress Ball. While prefatory remarks indicate that they are not ""a mere halter of sexual promiscuity""- it would be fair to say that they are more entertaining than edifying in any larger sense and the maxim chapter headings (i.e. ""Resistance should be honest and powerful;"" ""Why leave a meadow to batten in the moor;"") provide what little cautionary value they may contain. The cases are based to a great extent on the testimonies of those involved, with some connecting interpretation, and they retain the decorous rodomontade of earlier erase when a ""carnal connection"", while often exposed, could also be exonerated as a casual indiscretion... Most of the drama here takes place in the courtroom, not the bedroom, which may exclude one type of render while attracting another.

Pub Date: Feb. 26th, 1962
Publisher: Abedard-Schuman