SNOW-WHITE AND THE SEVEN DWARFS by The Brothers Grimm
Kirkus Star

SNOW-WHITE AND THE SEVEN DWARFS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The Jarrell-Burkert Snow White has become a sort of legend even before its time of publication, and that's the only feature of it about which we can say no wonder. Burkert's double-page pictures combine medieval symbolism and ornamentation with romantic fairy tale loveliness and vaguely unsettling realism (her dwarfs, for example, are truly, arrestingly dwarfs, not cute little gnomes). Whatever the scene -- Snow White with the wild beasts in a beautifully illuminated forest, the dwarfs in their homey cottage, the gloating stepmother in filmy gown literally floating away from her cobwebby paraphernalia of evil magic -- there is no doubt that each leaf, each jug, each animal (fox or fly) has a name, a compelling reason for being in the picture, and a history and dimension beyond it. Whether it's the power of the pictures or the grace of the translation or the concreteness of the Grimms' imagery, the text (on alternate double pages) has a crystal, visual quality from that first snowy scene of a ""window with a frame of ebony"" where ""a queen sat and sewed,"" so that even those departures from the straightforward concision of folklore (the dwarfs ""had made for her a coffin all of glass"") evoke a texture or an object that gives the words a firm reality.

Pub Date: Dec. 22nd, 1973
ISBN: 0374468680
Publisher: Farrar, Straus & Giroux