EXPLORING THE MOON WITH BINOCULARS by

EXPLORING THE MOON WITH BINOCULARS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

In case you have doubts as to whether minutiae of the moon can be seen with binoculars. Cherrintgon states at the outset that of the 670 named lunar features listed in Gerard Kniper's Photographic Lunar Atlas, he has seen 605 with ordinary 7 by 50 binoculars. This includes features down to five miles across and occasionally even smaller spots. What are binoculars after all, the author reminds, but paired telescopes, which, given today's optical standards, probably reveal more of the moon than Galileo and other seventeenth century astronomers were able to observe. Following this justification, Cherrington discusses how to buy and test glasses, and then summarizes the astronomical facts the novice needs to know, and the recent findings of Russian lunar probes as well as those of the Ranger, Surveyor, and Orbiter programs of NASA. Roughly two-thirds of the book is devoted to day-to-day instructions for observation of a typical lunation in almanac style: ""This evening Mare Nectaris is revealed completely."" Laced with the topographic guide however are additional historical facts and recent discoveries such as the color changes that have been noted by Russian and American observers presumed to be caused by outgassings. Thus Cherrington subtly reminds the reader/observer that the moon is far from static, and that there are rewards for the faithful.

Pub Date: Sept. 5th, 1968
Publisher: McGraw-Hill