THE GOLDEN BEES: A Century of Bonapartes by Theo Aronson

THE GOLDEN BEES: A Century of Bonapartes

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

Report repeated from p. 403 when scheduled for earlier publication as follows: ""An ambitious array, this parade of the Bonaparte clan as it rose to power, held and lost it. The author follows the family from the years before power, 1764 to 1804, through the First Empire, the years between, the Second Empire and the years after to 1920, when Napoleon III's empress Eugenie died, having survived her son lost in Natal, at the age of ninety-five. Despite the fact that Napoleon died in 1852, it is his figure which dominates the book. Here are all the details of dynasty in personal, private dress which could not fail to be public-- the divorce from Josephine to secure a legitimate heir, a supreme case in point. The constant obsession with succession to the throne was justified by the the trials of sickness and death the family endured. The story of the jousts for position, the marriages and affairs of the major figures and related branches add up to more than a footnote of French history.

Pub Date: Sept. 14th, 1964
Publisher: New York Graphic Society