THE HIGH KING'S DAUGHTER by Theodora DuBois

THE HIGH KING'S DAUGHTER

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Backdrop and some good stage effects help make the most of this dramatic spectacle of 9th century Ireland. Melcha plays straight to an audience of romantic teenage girls. She is the daughter of Malachy, chief king of Ireland, and the Norse invaders have threatened to ravage the land until she is brought back to their home to be the wife of the king's son. From the shelter of St. Brigid's convent, where she attends school, she quickly adapts to a more adventurous life when she is captured by the foe, escapes from a tower prison, masquerades as a member of a troupe of minstrels, and eventually, with Athelstan, her betrothed, plans the rout of the invader. It is the sort of story to entrance the sentimental but is neither as sensitive or as evocative of ancient England as Joyce Gard's Talargain (1965, p. 243, J-81) nor does it have the epic qualities of Eric Haugaard's Nordic series (A Slave's Tale, p. 436, J-150).

Pub Date: Sept. 15th, 1965
Publisher: Farrar, Straus & Giroux