CASTROISM: THEORY AND PRACTICE by Theodore Draper

CASTROISM: THEORY AND PRACTICE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

In both ideology and tactics, upon close examination, it seems that Castroism, like Topsy, just ""growed."" And the particular blackberry bush, according to this author's findings, was a hybrid: ""a particular case of cross-fertilization... of a Latin American revolutionary tradition and the European Communist tradition, just as Leninism represented a cross-fertilization of the Russian revolutionary tradition and the European Marxist tradition."" He calls it ""a particular case"" because he is unwilling to guess as yet whether Cuba's experience Will be typical of Latin American Communism as a whole. That degree of caution is maintained throughout the book with both deductions as to theory and with interpretations of events. Castro himself, also, is kept scrupulously separate from the manifestations of the ideology. The result is a persuasive study which illuminates a great deal in a steadily sustained fashion, with no barrage of fixed opinions. One of the more important chapters is a critical scrutiny of Senator Fulbright's famous speech of March 25, 1964, and an assiduous investigation of the economic problems Castroism has either inherited or created for itself.

Publisher: Praeger