THE BIOLOGY OF ULTIMATE CONCERN by Theodosius Dobzhansky

THE BIOLOGY OF ULTIMATE CONCERN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

In this second volume of NAL's ""Perspectives in Humanism"" series, one of the world's great geneticists attempts to integrate biology specifically, and science generally, with religious and aesthetic principles into a humanistic synthesis. Dr. Dobzhansky's specialty is evolutionary biology, and the salient characteristic of his work is the rational optimism with which he regards the unending process of human development, or evolution, toward a Teilhardian ""megasynthesis""--a posture not uninfluenced, as the author readily concedes, by Toynbee and Tillich on varying intellectual levels, as well as by the great Jesuit. Dobzhansky's concerns and approach in this work are essentially philosophical, and his views and methods will appeal more to the humanist than to the scientist (if one may use the terms as antonyms), and more to the Christian philosopher than to the humanist qua humanist. Unlike its predecessor volume in the series, therefore--Hadas' The Living Tradition--the present work, for all its dialectical and literary worth, will appeal primarily to a ""special audience"": the audience of Teilhard de Chardin.

Publisher: New American Library