A challenging yet inspiring regimen to get and stay healthy in midlife and beyond.

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Naked in 30 Days

A ONE-MONTH GUIDE TO GETTING YOUR BODY, MIND AND SPIRIT IN SHAPE

A 50-something fitness expert details her kick-start diet and exercise plan especially designed for aging women in this debut guide.

Even Roemer, an award-winning bodybuilder and personal trainer who created and then sold her own chain of health clubs, wasn’t immune from the effects of aging. “My body had changed irrevocably after 30, and especially after 50,” she notes, with a hysterectomy in her early 50s contributing to being “bloated for the first time in my life.” In this guide, Roemer, 54, outlines an action plan to help others regain vibrancy, drawing on “what has worked for me” to “still stay in shape and take pride in who I am naked—in body, mind and spirit.” She spreads out 1,400 calories over six meals daily within a high-protein, low-carb, and vegetable-focused diet with little to no wheat or gluten and very little added sugar. Her exercise regimen consists of three days of one-hour cardio sessions, three days of targeted weight training (upper body, legs/glutes, and chest, back, and shoulders) with ab/core exercises accompanying all workouts, and one rest day per week. Roemer also sprinkles “Mind/Spirit” tips within her day-by-day chapters, advising readers to grieve, relax, volunteer, and meditate. She often references her own life challenges, including the death of her 19-year-old son in a car accident. The author recommends consulting with a doctor, offers an introduction from her own physician (part of her consulting team for this book), and provides a form to chart one’s progress and a brief reading list. Texas-based Roemer currently works out at Sparta Fitness (its co-owners are credited as consultants), and the term “spartan” certainly applies to this volume. The author’s meal plans are disciplined (only salmon and a small side salad, for example, is one suggestion for dinner) and her weightlifting exercises, which would have benefitted by accompanying illustrations, quite comprehensive. Roemer remains living proof of the strong, beautiful results to be achieved, with a photo of the proudly naked, 5-foot-9-inch, 155-pound author (who dropped nearly 20 pounds on this plan) featured in this manual. 

A challenging yet inspiring regimen to get and stay healthy in midlife and beyond.

Pub Date: March 5, 2016

ISBN: 978-1-62601-253-0

Page Count: 250

Publisher: Riverdale Avenue Books, LLC

Review Posted Online: June 15, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 15, 2016

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Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis...

THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE

50TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION

Privately published by Strunk of Cornell in 1918 and revised by his student E. B. White in 1959, that "little book" is back again with more White updatings.

Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis (whoops — "A bankrupt expression") a unique guide (which means "without like or equal").

Pub Date: May 15, 1972

ISBN: 0205632645

Page Count: 105

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: Oct. 28, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1972

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Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

SEVERAL SHORT SENTENCES ABOUT WRITING

New York Times columnist and editorial board member delivers a slim book for aspiring writers, offering saws and sense, wisdom and waggery, biases and biting sarcasm.

Klinkenborg (Timothy; or, Notes of an Abject Reptile, 2006), who’s taught for decades, endeavors to keep things simple in his prose, and he urges other writers to do the same. (Note: He despises abuses of the word as, as he continually reminds readers.) In the early sections, the author ignores traditional paragraphing so that the text resembles a long free-verse poem. He urges readers to use short, clear sentences and to make sure each one is healthy before moving on; notes that it’s acceptable to start sentences with and and but; sees benefits in diagramming sentences; stresses that all writing is revision; periodically blasts the formulaic writing that many (most?) students learn in school; argues that knowing where you’re headed before you begin might be good for a vacation, but not for a piece of writing; and believes that writers must trust readers more, and trust themselves. Most of Klinkenborg’s advice is neither radical nor especially profound (“Turn to the poets. / Learn from them”), and the text suffers from a corrosive fallacy: that if his strategies work for him they will work for all. The final fifth of the text includes some passages from writers he admires (McPhee, Oates, Cheever) and some of his students’ awkward sentences, which he treats analytically but sometimes with a surprising sarcasm that veers near meanness. He includes examples of students’ dangling modifiers, malapropisms, errors of pronoun agreement, wordiness and other mistakes.

Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

Pub Date: Aug. 7, 2012

ISBN: 978-0-307-26634-7

Page Count: 224

Publisher: Knopf

Review Posted Online: May 14, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2012

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