WOODROW WILSON AND THE GREAT BETRAYAL by Thomas A. Bailey

WOODROW WILSON AND THE GREAT BETRAYAL

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

Companion study to Woodrow Wilson and the Lost Peace and once again an explicitly detailed, cleanly detached retelling of the failure of his last crusade, when he tried to sell the League of Nations to the American people. Preoccupied with home conditions, given over to the ""slump in idealism"", victims of Republican prejudice and partisanship, the people were indifferent to the League; the western tour was foredoomed to failure, and killed the man as well as the ideal. The stroke and protracted illness; the death of the Treaty; the President's renewal of the fight; the dismissal of Lansing -- a politically wrong though technically right manoeuver; the election of 1920 and the tidal victory of Harding and the Republicans; Wilson's retirement and death, his vision of world peace unshaken. The great historical object lesson of today, well done for the scholar, but perhaps too detailed for the general reader.

Pub Date: June 26th, 1945
Publisher: Macmillan