THE MAN IN THE STREET by Thomas A. Bailey

THE MAN IN THE STREET

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A detailed, not overly-flattering picture of the American public, its make-up, characteristics, opinions, attitudes, prejudices, sectionalism, antecedents, and so on, especially in relation to American foreign policy. Based largely on findings of the Gallup Polls, and with considerable stress on historical backgrounds, this studies minutely the sovereign, if often misdirected power of the American voter. Among ideas reviewed are war moods, national honor, sectional attitudes, voter apathy, self interest, short-sightedness, fickleness, the ""sucker"" complex, dollar diplomacy, cults of ""Munroe Doctrine"", ""Manifest Destiny"", freedom of the seas, open door, and other American concepts. These are viewed in relation to the man in the street, himself identified as to race, religion, background, etc. Informative, highly readable analysis of the American public- might be termed a psychological ""inside U.S.A."" in scholarly terms. Should have popular significance in election year.

Pub Date: April 20th, 1948
Publisher: Macmillan