THE QUARRIES OF SICILY by Thomas Doulis

THE QUARRIES OF SICILY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

There is much moralizing, philosophizing and pontificating in this rather dull novel that deals with narrator Gordon Warrington's fight to further the reputation of an aging Greek writer, Stamos Patrinos. Gordon has become his translator and partial discoverer and he finds in Patrinos' work, about the mythical Pelasgian War, the motif for present day problems. An American film producer also finds a similarity and has come to the island of Chicos to see about the possibility of a movie that would make a parallel to the issues in Vietnam. They both run into petty disputes and political enmity with Gordon who makes a soul-searching appraisal of Stamos' book which he finds not only about war but about the ""morality of growth, of development."" Then Patrinos gives Gordon his latest nihilistic novel, and Gordon finds that his prophet of the positive has turned into an apostle of despair. This leaves Gordon testing his own conscience and commitment. But Mr. Doulis is inevitably a polemicist without a real argument. . . or a story.

Pub Date: June 1st, 1969
Publisher: Crown