ALIENATION, ATHEISM AND THE RELIGIOUS CRISIS by Thomas F. O'Dea

ALIENATION, ATHEISM AND THE RELIGIOUS CRISIS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Professor O'Dea (University of California) is an indifferent writer, which is a pity, for his ideas on the significance of the ""religious crisis"" are incisive, stimulating and important. He views that crisis as part of the more general crisis of the twentieth century, a questioning and rejection of traditional--and often self-contradictory values--and develops that thesis under its political aspects as well as its religious ones. It is his belief that the three traditional sources of Western values--religion, humanism and science--are now inadequate guides for man, and that humanity must now evolve for itself, on the basis of those sources, a new system of values, one which will be an ever-expanding consciousness of the human condition rather than a mere ideology. Today's youth, as quick as they are to recognize the failure of the old system as a statement of religious and political values, are too immature to be able to formulate an alternative; they protest, but they do not suggest. It is therefore the task of the mature society not only to remake the human community, but to formulate a philosophy, almost a technique, of human development. Once he hurtles the obstacle of O'Dea's stylistic failings, the reader will discover very rational discussion.

Pub Date: April 16th, 1969
Publisher: Sheed & Ward