PROTESTANT CONCEPTS OF CHURCH AND STATE by Thomas G. Sanders
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PROTESTANT CONCEPTS OF CHURCH AND STATE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This is the first volume in a series on Studies of Church and State, offered in cooperation with the Department of Religious Liberty of the National Council of Churches. The approach in this volume is historical. From its origin the problem of the church's relation to the state has been a troubling one. Protestantism, the author shows, shares with Roman Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy three elements in all Christian political theory: the dualism of church and state, the sovereignty of God over both, and the state as potentially both good and evil. The diversity of Protestantism, particularly on the American scene, leads to a variety of answers to the church-state problem. Five are identified, the first three rooted in denominational outlook: Lutheran, Anabaptist and Mennonite, and Quaker; and the last two cutting across denominational positions: the thoroghgoing separatists, and the pragmatists and advocates of moderation. Throughout the book there is sound and carefully marshalled historical evidence. The volume should be a most valuable addition to the growing literature on the subject at a time when the question of church-state relations is assuming new proportions. For scholars, but also for serious lay readers.

Pub Date: May 26th, 1964
Publisher: Holt, Rinehart & Winston