THE CITY WHEN IT RAINS by Thomas H. Cook

THE CITY WHEN IT RAINS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Scaled down Cook (Night Secrets, p. 610, etc.)--less verbiage/fewer plot intricacies--in which free-lance photographer David Corman snaps a suicide (a woman jumping to her death from a fifth-floor window) and wonders whether there's a book in it: the emaciated woman had sold her blood to buy Similac to feed her doll. Why? Who was she? Fighting off his ex-wife's attempt to wrest custody of their daughter, Lucy, from him, Corman--desperate for money--lets himself be swayed by a publisher angling for a scandal, then backs off and reclaims his integrity. Meanwhile, his mentor, Lazar, dies of a stroke; Corman toys with the idea of a day job (shooting society lunches, etc.) and fends off a subsidy offer from his ex's husband, who doesn't want custody of Lucy. As he sorts through both personal and professional crossroads in his life, Corman also deals with those in the suicide's, for a downbeat but honest answer to her life. Morose vignettes of troubled city lives--a Cook specialty. Keenly observed, in sad, lean (for Cook) prose.

Pub Date: Jan. 10th, 1990
ISBN: 399-13555-3
Publisher: Putnam
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