THE INVISIBLE RELIGION by Thomas Luckman

THE INVISIBLE RELIGION

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KIRKUS REVIEW

In our time the identity of the individual as an individual seems threatened by a society increasingly ""organized and monolithic."" Dr. Luckman has undertaken the task of analyzing the possibilities offered by modern religion for the reinforcement of subjective autonomy, examining the relationship between religion, church and sociology, the nature of church-oriented religion on the periphery of modern society, the anthropological condition of religion, individual religiosity, and religion and personal identity in modern society. The thesis, established on premises enunciated by Durkheim and Weber, is that the problem of personal identity is essentially a religious one; and the conclusion-- one that the rules of scholarly decorum and prudence require the author to state in an epilogue rather than in the main part of the work--is that the now, social form of religion, because it makes sacred the liberation of human consciousness from the constraint of social structure, represents an unprecedented opportunity for relative autonomy for all men. A careful and scholarly work, The Invisible Religion makes few concessions, terminological or logical, to the lay reader; it is a work, however, that will be of much interest to professionals in the social sciences.

Pub Date: Feb. 23rd, 1967
Publisher: Macmillan