A JOURNEY WITH THE SAINTS by Thomas S. Kepler

A JOURNEY WITH THE SAINTS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

In a world groping for security and order and to human beings frantic in their own search for personal integrity and spiritual peace this book could be as balm of Gilead. In a foreword of yearning tenderness reminiscent of our Lord's grieving over Jerusalem, Professor Kepler makes a moving appeal for ""sainthood"" in the world today. Saints, he says, speak a common language of the spirit; their lives are ""radiant"" because ""rooted"" in the spirit of God Himself. They long to be the instruments of God; they accept the ""call"" to be saints and for all their personal sense of humility and shame for failure they know that God's Kingdom can only be revived beginning with them. Not geniuses, necessarily, but humans with extraordinary perceptions of goodness they seek perpetually the limitation of Christ and continual practise of the presence of God. They are God-centered; they strive for a revolution of the spirit. They do not cast out all the old goods because they show weakness; they stay by the goods and attempt a remedy from within. The 40 studies in this volume comprise a compilation of Professor Kepler's contributions to certain metropolitan newspapers. Here are saints of old and modern days, ranging from Cyprian and Augustine to Thomas Moore and Martin Luther; Pascal, brother Laurence, John Wesley, Rufus Jones, Albert Schweitzer and Kagawa. Thumb nail sketches almost, but vital bits of interpretative writing. Protestant, but not sectarian.

Publisher: World