TUNNEL UNDER THE CHANNEL by Thomas Whiteside

TUNNEL UNDER THE CHANNEL

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KIRKUS REVIEW

For almost two centuries it has been the dream of Englishman and Frenchman alike to cut a tunnel under the English Channel and connect their two nations. Better said, it is the dream of some of them. This book tells the story of that dream, how it has been continually thwarted by xenophobes, and how it might soon become reality. Although 350 miles long, it develops that the Channel between Dover and Cap Gris-Nez is less than 21 miles across and very shallow. It is in this area, the author tells us, men like Mathieu, de Gamond, and Watkins have hatched their tunneling ideas. And the ideas are fantastic. Some involve complete tunnels with railways and all. Others for tubes, Channels under the Channel, even a vast bridge to span it. Although the has always caught the public's fancy, the isolationists and who fear England could be easily conquered should a tunnel connect her with Europe have staunchly opposed it. Today, with the Common Market and other closening of European ties, new plans are being devised. All are given full examination in this short, well written account, as is the famous attempt of Sir Edward Watkins in the when British nobility drank champagne under the Channel in a tunnel begun by him. Excellent.

Publisher: Simon & Schuster