Thrillers Book Reviews (page 4)

FOOL ME ONCE by Harlan Coben
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 22, 2016

"Once again, Coben marries his two greatest strengths—masterfully paced plotting that leads to a climactic string of fireworks and the ability to root all the revelations in deeply felt emotions—in a tale guaranteed to fool even the craftiest readers a lot more than once."
Coben (The Stranger, 2015, etc.) hits the bull's eye again with this taut tale of a disgraced combat veteran whose homefront life is turned upside down by an image captured by her nanny cam.Read full book review >
The Computer Heist by Michael P. King
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 22, 2016

"King strikes another vein of modern noir gold in this technology tale."
King's (The Traveling Man, 2015) latest thriller picks up the trail of his married con artists as they descend on a software company.Read full book review >

The China Saboteurs by Jake Bronsen
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 22, 2016

"An underdeveloped thriller with a protagonist that could have been fleshed out more."
A veteran homeland-security agent vows justice in the mysterious death of a young auditor investigating the plagued production of a Pentagon fighter jet in this thriller. Read full book review >
Red Phoenix Burning by Larry Bond
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 16, 2016

"Readers should hardly notice the novel's epic length, breezing through laudable characters and a global plot running at full tilt."
In this military thriller, a coup in North Korea begets civil war, which, given the country's chemical and nuclear weapons, could have worldwide repercussions. Read full book review >
THE GIRL ON THE RUN by Gregg Olsen
THRILLERS
Released: March 15, 2016

"Without dropping a beat, the story ends in a crescendo of danger and turmoil and paves the way for the vigilante teen to take on more criminals in subsequent books. (Thriller. 14 & up)"
Bestselling true-crime writer Olsen takes a successful stab at thriller writing for teens. Read full book review >

JUST FALL by Nina Sadowsky
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 15, 2016

"The novel concludes with threat of a sequel, but it's hard to stimulate much interest in seeing what Rob and Ellie do next."
In Sadowsky's debut thriller, a young woman must face her own capacity for violence in order to save the man she loves. Read full book review >
BAD SIGNS by R.J. Ellory
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 15, 2016

"The story has enough depth to work on a few levels: as an existential look at the nature of fate or as a gripping story in its own right. And it wouldn't be a stretch to see the caring Clay and the violent Digger as symbols of America's divided psyche at this point in its history."
Is it truly possible to be born under a bad sign? The half brothers in Ellory's (Ghostheart, 2015, etc.) latest novel think so, and their attempts to shake their destiny are the subject of a haunting thriller set in the early 1960s. Read full book review >
DEEP BLUE by Randy Wayne White
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 15, 2016

"The front-loading of the major surprises makes this adventure middling among Doc Ford's recent Bond-like encounters with villains with political agendas (Cuba Straits, 2015, etc.)."
Marine biologist Marion D. Ford interrupts his endless partying at Sanibel Island long enough to get involved in another round of international counterterrorism. Read full book review >
Said the Fly by Laurie Taylor
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 9, 2016

"A buzz-worthy initial offering in a planned mystery series."
A blowfly, a grasshopper leg, and a tiny flower are the unlikely clues that help a zoologist track down a killer in this dazzling island mystery. Read full book review >
OFF THE GRID by C.J. Box
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 8, 2016

"Even though you just know Box isn't going to put an end to his highly successful franchise by blowing his lead characters to kingdom come, you can't help turning the pages and holding your breath until you find out where this scary, all-too-plausible caravan is heading."
Terrorists, libertarians, and wild cards duke it out in game warden Joe Pickett's Wyoming. Read full book review >
THE STEEL KISS by Jeffery Deaver
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 8, 2016

"Fans savvy enough to ignore the ill-advised extras and keep their eyes on the duel between Rhyme and Unsub 40 will be treated to all the usual thrills, which are worth every breathless minute."
The latest of Lincoln Rhyme's fiendishly inventive antagonists is a killer who rails against rampant consumerism online, then hacks into the Internet of Things to murder New Yorkers who've grown too attached to their computer-driven toys. Read full book review >
Shape, Shine and Shadow by John Benacre
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 6, 2016

"An IRA protagonist perhaps too smart for his pursuers, but the recurring character is always entertaining."
The failure of a resurgent Irish Republican Army-planned bombing in 2016 London puts an Irishman on the run from both MI5 and his boss in Benacre's (McCann, 2015, etc.) thriller. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frances Stroh
author of BEER MONEY
May 4, 2016

Frances Stroh’s earliest memories are ones of great privilege: shopping trips to London and New York, lunches served by black-tied waiters at the Regency Hotel, and a house filled with precious antiques, which she was forbidden to touch. Established in Detroit in 1850, by 1984 the Stroh Brewing Company had become the largest private beer fortune in America and a brand emblematic of the American dream itself; while Stroh was coming of age, the Stroh family fortune was estimated to be worth $700 million. But behind the beautiful façade lay a crumbling foundation. As their fortune dissolved in little over a decade, the family was torn apart internally by divorce and one family member's drug bust; disagreements over the management of the business; and disputes over the remaining money they possessed. “The author’s family might have successfully burned through a massive fortune, but they squandered a lot more than that,” our reviewer writes about Stroh’s debut memoir, Beer Money. “A sorrowful, eye-opening examination of familial dysfunction.” View video >