Thrillers Book Reviews (page 4)

Released: July 7, 2015

"A disturbingly dark and strangely realistic novel of suspense and myth that will appeal to enthusiasts of both mysteries and more fantastical fiction."
In his first novel to be available in English, Spjut offers readers a substantial, menacing thriller that combines familiar elements of Scandinavian crime fiction with Swedish mythology. Read full book review >
SPY GAMES by Adam Brookes
Released: July 7, 2015

"Brookes' second novel is a multipronged spy thriller that fires on all cylinders. A smarter or more exciting mystery likely won't be released this year."
Having survived a disastrous turn of events in China in Brookes' sensational debut, Night Heron (2014), British journalist-cum-spy Philip Mangan is dragged back into perilous waters by a mysterious Chinese official who wants to trade state secrets.Read full book review >

The Tattooed Arm by M. Simpson
Released: July 5, 2015

"A colorful, enjoyable novel with a fearless, savvy heroine."
A 1930s woman makes a frightening leap into the criminal underworld in Simpson's debut Australian noir thriller. Read full book review >
RAMPAGE by Alan Brenham
Released: July 4, 2015

"Precise and unequivocally gripping; an edge-of-your-seat ride from beginning to end."
In Brenham's (Cornered, 2014, etc.) latest thriller, cops in Austin, Texas, face off against a former convict on a vengeance-driven, murderous crime spree. Read full book review >
Reading the Streets by Michael Riley
Released: July 2, 2015

"A tense mystery that's concerned more with why than how."
In Riley's debut thriller, a West London detective inspector working a murder case gradually uncovers possible corruption among the authorities. Read full book review >

THE ENGLISH SPY by Daniel Silva
Released: June 30, 2015

"This page-turner deepens Allon's legend and illuminates more of his shadowy world, all while cementing Silva's place among the top tier of spy thriller writers."
Gabriel Allon may be a talented, world-renowned restorer of classic paintings, but he's willing to kneecap a Russian spy if necessary. Read full book review >
Plagued, With Guilt by Michael Jason Brandt
Released: June 27, 2015

"A striking, frightening debut that heralds the start of a promising career."
Brandt plumbs the depths of suspense, pathology, and ancient history in this debut novel, at once a fierce academic thriller and a powerful meditation on humanity. Read full book review >
FOUR SEATS by Aaron Cooley
Released: June 25, 2015

"A scorching pace makes this savvy thriller a quick read."
In Cooley's (Shaken, Not Stirred, 2013) legal thriller, a U.S. Supreme Court policeman uncovers a conspiracy while searching for the people who bombed the Supreme Court. Read full book review >
Baksheesh (Bribes) by DS Kane
Released: June 25, 2015

"More wild, violent adventures in the world of international espionage.
In the fifth installment of the Spies Lie series, former covert operative Cassandra Sashakovich is finally ready to settle down with her family, though a plot to start World War III threatens to pull her back into danger. Read full book review >
Skully, Perdition Games by L.E. Fraser
Released: June 21, 2015

"A fast-paced mystery featuring plenty of excitement."
Kidnapping, murder, and mind games are afoot in Fraser's (Simon Says, 2014) latest thriller, which revisits PI Sam McNamara as she tackles a new case.Read full book review >
THE FIXER by Joseph Finder
Released: June 9, 2015

"Finder returns with another thriller that will have you shaking your head over the protagonist's actions but still turning the pages to find out what happens next."
A struggling writer finds $3.4 million in cash in a crawl space in his old house, leading him to discover the truth about his stroke-ridden father. Read full book review >
Broken Angels by Russell Heath
Released: June 9, 2015

"An auspicious mystery debut."
In this bleak Alaskan noir, an embittered, street-hardened woman is determined to find her estranged mother's killer. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
John Sandford
author of SATURN RUN
October 6, 2015

Saturn Run, John Sandford’s new novel, is quite a departure for the bestselling thriller writer, who sets aside his Lucas Davenport crime franchise (Gathering Prey, 2015, etc.) and partners with photographer and sci-fi buff Ctein to leave Earth’s gravitational field for the rings of Saturn. The year is 2066. A Caltech intern inadvertently notices an anomaly from a space telescope—something is approaching Saturn, and decelerating. Space objects don’t decelerate; spaceships do. A flurry of top-level government meetings produces the inescapable conclusion: whatever built that ship is at least 100 years ahead in hard and soft technology, and whoever can get their hands on it exclusively and bring it back will have an advantage so large, no other nation can compete. A conclusion the Chinese definitely agree with when they find out. The race is on. “James Bond meets Tom Swift, with the last word reserved not for extraterrestrial encounters but for international piracy, state secrets, and a spot of satisfyingly underhanded political pressure,” our reviewer writes. View video >